2017

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Decade.png 2010s: )    Year.png 2017 Rdf-icon.png
Chartoftheday 11551 americans top fears of 2017 n.jpg
In 2017, "Terrorism" dropped from being the #2 fear of US citizens in 2016 to #22! Their biggest fear was "corrupt government officials", up 15% in one year to 75%.
In 2017 the legal, ideological and technical foundations of internet censorship were expanded under the veil of the (increasingly disbelieved) threat of "terrorism". US adults' biggest fear continued to be, not "terrorism" but "corrupt government officials".

In 2017 the phrase "deep state" was widely (with contrasting definitions) used by the commercially-controlled media. This followed their introduction of the "Fake News" meme in November 2016. 2017 saw reports of censorship of many the 200 sites listed by PropOrNot, including Naked Capitalism, Truthdig and Counterpunch[1] and an April adjustment of Google's search algorithm to send less visitors to progressive websites[2]. The case Saleh v. Bush was concluded in February 2017, and the Bush administration officials deemed not guilty of war crimes since "The actions that (Bush administration officials) took in connection with the Iraq War were part of their official duties".[3]

"Fake News"

Full article: Rated 3/5 “Fake News”

The "Fake News website" meme introduced in November 2016 appears to have been intended to smear websites to bolster faith in the commercially-controlled media, was quickly reduced to the issue of "fake news". Global efforts were underway in 2017 to try to automate censorship (a.k.a. "fact checking") and crack down on whistleblowers. In the UK, Conservative MP Damian Collins is heading an inquiry into combatting the so-called "fake news" problem, which is reportedly considering increasing the maximum punishment for publishing real information online, from 2 years to 14 years.[4] Various commentators have suggested that the net effect of the "fake news" meme may have been a type of blowback - encouraging everyone to be more critical consumers of news, checking facts and sources.

Deep state exposure

After years of being ignored, the phrase "deep state" became popular after the 2016 US Presidential election and has continued to grow in popularity, particularly in the case of the US Deep State.[5] In 2017, leaks continue, including a leak of hacking tools, which were offered for sale by a group calling itself Shadow Brokers.

"War On Terror"

The Home Office tweet announcing that they would set up a new commission to "counter extremism".[6]
Full article: Rated 4/5 “War On Terror”

In January, outgoing US president Barack Obama signed Executive Order 12333. This expanded the provision for mass surveillance by removing legal restrictinos on the NSA sharing intercepted raw data with agencies including the FBI, the DEA, and the Department of Homeland Security.[7]

In UK three acts of "Muslim terrorism" in the run up to the General Election continued the "War On Terror". They had little detectable affect upon the election result.

Action Counters Terrorism

ACT-Blue.png
Full article: Action Counters Terrorism

In March 2017, the UK government - still unreceptive to the population's growing doubts about the 9/11 official narrative - re-branded its "counter terrorism" activity by launching a campaign entitled "Action Counters Terrorism".

2017 Refugee False Flag

Full article: 2017 Refugee False Flag
The 2017 Refugee False Flag plot was never carried out, after carelessness in Vienna airport lead to its being exposed

In April, carelessness by 'Franco A.', an officer of the German Bundeswehr, lead to uncovering of the False Flag plot after he was arrested with a firearm in Vienna airport. Having created a fake Syrian identity in 2015, he was charged in 2017 with two conspirators for planning an "act of state-threatening violence".[8] The commercially-controlled media reported on their arrest, but did not spend long on their case. They were released in November 2017 on grounds of lack of evidence.[9]

"Commission for Countering Extremism"

Full article: Commission for Countering Extremism

After the Manchester bombing, the UK Home Office announced their intention to set up a "Commission for Countering Extremism‎" with an unusually militaristic photo (left) which was criticised fairly widely.[citation needed]

UK General Election

Full article: UK/2017 General Election

In UK the Prime Minister Theresa May called a snap election when her party was a long way ahead in the polls, aiming to increase her parliamentary majority. The opposition Jeremy Corbyn however defied predictions by closing the gap and increasing the seats held by the Labour Party, resulting in a hung parliament, leading the Tories to form a coalition with the DUP.

Young people in particular were heavily in support of the Labour party. The UK suffered three acts of "terrorism" during the election campaign, the 2017 Westminster attack, the Manchester Bombing & the June 2017 London attack. In spite of heavy coverage by the commercially-controlled media, these did not appear to greatly influence the election outcome, which was a hung parliament and an increased support for the Labour Party under Corbyn.

 

Events

Event
Al-Salam weapons deal
Saleh v. Bush
2017 Refugee False Flag
Brexit
Wikileaks/Vault 7
Action Counters Terrorism
2017 Westminster attack
2017 Manchester bombing
Bilderberg/2017
June 2017 London attack
Grenfell Tower fire
Nuclear Weapon Ban Treaty
2017 Las Vegas shooting
Paradise Papers
Wikileaks/Vault 8
 

New Groups

GroupImageDate
Commission for Countering ExtremismCommission for Countering Extremism.png2017 - Present
Labour Against The WitchhuntCropped-LAW-logo-with-rose.jpgOctober 2017 - Present
 

==A Group that was Wound Up== 

Quotations

References

Facts about "2017"
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