"Fact checking"

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Concept.png "Fact checking"
(propaganda,  Orwellian language)Rdf-entity.pngRdf-icon.png
Facebook-factchecks-offg-again.jpg
Interest of• David Grimes
• Social Observatory for Disinformation and Social Media Analysis
A thinly veiled effort to counter suspicion in official narratives as promoted by the commercially-controlled media. i.e. "Trust us, we've fact checked this article".

"Fact checking" is a phrase used by the commercially-controlled media to suggest the open-minded checking of facts. In fact, the activities of fact checkers are de facto tightly circumscribed by the funding institution, and may include promotion of deliberate misinformation.[1]

Launch

"Fact checking" rose to prominence as part of the ill-fated "fake news website" campaign was launched in Autumn 2016, most notably with the Washington Post promotion of the Propornot List that was printed under the name Craig Timberg.

Concerns

The process of "fact checking" assumes that there are impartial people (or algorithms). In fact such "fact checkers" do not, arguably cannot, exist.[2]

Artificial intelligence

Full article: Artificial intelligence

Various efforts have been made to automate the "fact checking" process, but as of 2019, the fundamental obstacle that computers cannot reliably parse English (or other human languages) remains insurmountable, rendering automated "fact checking" inherently fallible.


 

An example

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"Fact checker"

 

Related Quotation

PageQuote
Answering Russia's Strategic Narratives“Russia’s disinformation campaigns have enabled the Kremlin to sow divisions in Europe’s societies. Countering these actions requires the development of effective, multi-layered strategies, tactics and capabilities. HCSS organizes a conference on 22 June 2017 to bring together and expand upon a network of stakeholders involved in countering Russian societal interference in European countries.

Through the exchange of governmental responses used at the military and foreign policy level, and the experiences of societal bottom-up initiatives and fact-checking collaborative initiatives, we can begin to build an increasingly coherent response to Russia’s strategic narratives.

The explicit goal is to foster a self-sustaining network that can act as a dissemination point in countering Russian disinformation and other kinds of malign interference. Through the stimulation of debate, participants will produce a concise overview that will take stock of best practices and perspectives for action.”


References