Torture

From Wikispooks
Jump to: navigation, search
Concept.png Torture 
(Crime) Average Rating: 3 3 from 1 reviews
Torture.jpg
Interest of • Rebecca Gordon
• Jeffrey Kaye
• Jeffrey S. Kaye
• School of the Americas
Torture is the deliberate infliction of pain, used both as a means of obtaining information (though for this purpose it is notoriously unreliable) and (such as at Guantánamo Bay) to terrorise entire populations.

Official Narrative

The official narrative is usually maintained that countries such as US, UK etc. do not torture, since that would be illegal. Instead "enhanced interrogation" techniques are used to stay within the law. Not to use such methods would jeopardize "national security" and they are only used on "terrorist" suspects. Where admissions of torture are made, they are generally many years after the event, to prevent damaging legal investigations into what went on and who was involved.

Barack Obama's offhand admission that "we tortured some folks" on August 1, 2014[1] may be understood as a softening up for a change of this (centuries long) official narrative; possibly the strategy was to prepare the public for the release of a US Senate report into the CIA’s extensive programmes of torture and illegal detention.

Purposes

The perception consistently given by commercially-controlled media is that torture is used for obtaining accurate information, especially about imminent terrorist actions. In practice, information gained from torture is highly unreliable at best.

Terrorisation

"Enhanced interrogation" is readily understood to be a euphemism designed to minimize legal and public relations problems, one that even a dumbed down US populace can understand. A major function of torture is to terrorise - this function was researched during its use in South East Asia (Operation Phoenix), later refined in South America (Operation Condor).[2] Whilst paradoxical if the claimed justification of the "War on Terror" is taken at face value, this is good business sense from the point of view of the Terrorism industry; terrorising a population is an effective means to promote terror (and "terrorism"), resulting in increased anxiety about the danger of "terrorism", and promoting expenditure and increasing profits.

Gaining information

Torture is effective at obtaining information whether people have any or not - rendering such information questionable at best. Fictional confessions may of course be useful to those seeking to fabricate evidence against people, and a major part of the official narrative about 9/11 appears was derived from evidence obtained using torture. The US Police have admitted to using death threats to obtain information.[3]

Medical Research

The CIA has been using experimental torture techniques, as is evident in the Senate Intelligence Committee's summary of its investigative report. One commentator suggests that it may be more effective to seek prosecution under statutes about unethical medical research.[4]

United Nations Convention Against Torture

Full article: Stub class article United Nations Convention Against Torture
Torture opinions.jpg

Since 26 June 1987, the UN Convention Against Torture has required signatory parties to take effective measures to prevent torture within their borders, and forbids them to transport people to any country where there is reason to believe they will be tortured. Almost all major nation states have signed and ratified it (with India being a notable exception) although its enforcement is openly flouted by many nations, most notably those which are promoting "War on terror" rhetoric.

Examples

Torturebytaliban.png

UK

Full article: Stub class article UK/Torture

The last official torture warrant in England was issued in 1641. While stating to Parliament in 2009 that "Torture is abhorrent. Britain never supports or condones it. So it sticks in the gullet when people try to pretend we do." David Miliband also insisted that the UK's interrogation policy should not be made public.[5][6]

US

Full article: US/Torture

The US is a signatory to the United Nations Convention Against Torture, so torture carried out by US government agencies is generally carried out by proxy and/or in legally obscure jurisdictions, such as Guantanamo Bay. In 2014, US President Barack Obama brazenly admitted "we tortured some folks" but made no admission that such acts constituted crimes or that this wrong doing would be investigated.[7]  

Examples

     Page name     Description
Abu Ghraib torture and prisoner abuse
CIA/TortureUS foreign policy has made extensive use of torture since at least the 1960s, and continues to do so. Only since 9/11 has it been more or less openly admitted and have moves been made to try to secure legal justification.
Copper Green
Phoenix Program
Sensory deprivationA method of torture that leaves no marks on the body.
 

Victims of Torture on Wikispooks

TitleDescription
Shaker Aamer
Babar AhmadUS pressure had Babar Ahmad arrested and held for 10 years in UK, although he had broken no UK law. He was beaten up by UK police in 2003. A petition signed by 149,388 people did not prevent his extradition to US - with no evidence of wrong doing provided - a county where it is likely he has been tortured.
Moazzam BeggMoazzam Begg banged up in both Guantanamo Bay and HMP Belmarsh
DilawarA taxi driver who was in the wrong place at the the wrong time. Tortured while in US custody and dead within the week. A leaked autopsy revealed "homicide", but the US authorities have not taken any action in this regard.
Emad Abdalla HassanA person who was in the wrong place at the wrong time, sold to US for $5000 and has been subject to illegal imprisonment and torture in Guantanamo Bay ever since. Cleared for relase in 2010, he remains a prisoner.
Omar KhadrA Canadian citizen who has nearly spent 1/2 of his life in military detention, after being arrested as a minor caught in a firefight in which several of his adult companions and a US soldier were killed.
Patrice LumumbaThe first democratically elected Prime Minister of the Republic of the Congo, abducted, tortured and murdered. Foreign intelligence service involvement is strongly suspected.
Binyam Mohamed
Khalid Sheikh Mohammed
Baha MousaAn Iraqi civilian tortured to death by UK soldiers.
Abu OmarAn Egyptian cleric who was kindnapped in Milan by the CIA in 2003 and sent to Egypt where he was subject to torture.
José PadillaSubjected to Sensory deprivation for years before even being charged.
Inês Etienne RomeuShe is believed to have been the only captive to survive detention in a Brazilian torture centre known as the Casa da Morta, "the house of death"
Rubén López Sabariego
Yunis Abdurrahman Shokuri
Aafia SiddiquiAafia Siddiqui is an American-educated Pakistani cognitive neuroscientist, tortured and raped for years by US forces, now serving a life sentence after a trial of a highly questionable nature.
Josef Trimpert
Mordechai VanunuThe former Israeli nuclear technician who, citing his opposition to weapons of mass destruction, revealed details of Israel's nuclear weapons program to the British press in 1986.He was captured by Mossad, kidnapped and subsequently imprisoned for 18 years, including 11 years in solitary confinement. He continues to be subject to harrassment and forbidden to speak to foreigners or to leave Israel.
Abu ZubaydahA prisoner of the deep state, subjected to torture, denied legal process.
Khaled al-Maqtari
 

Related Documents

TitleTypePublication dateAuthor(s)Description
7/7 Terror and Tortureblog post7 July 2010Nafeez Mosaddeq Ahmed
A Long History of America's Dark Sidearticle7 October 2010Peter Dale Scott
Robert Parry
Americans are encouraged to unquestioningly view their country and its soldiers as the "good guys" spreading “democracy” and “liberty” around the world. When the US inflicts death and destruction, it’s viewed as a mistake or an aberration. This article reviews the long history of these acts of brutality, a record that suggests they are neither a “mistake” nor an “aberration” but a conscious counterinsurgency doctrine on the "dark side".
Child Soldier Coerced Into Plea-Bargainarticle7 October 2010Keith Jones
File:Children in Military Custody.pdfreportJune 20129 UK govt. appointed legal experts
File:EstablishingNewNormal.pdfreportJuly 2010American Civil Liberties UnionUnder the Obama Administration
Guantanamo SOP Confirms Psychological Torturearticle17 November 2007Stephen Soldz
Julian Assange
Standard operating procedures for military personnel running the Guatanamo Bay military prison confirm that the rules governing the treatment of its inmates amounts to systematic torture
File:Mendez-Chatham House lecture.pdfreport10 September 2012Juan Méndez
My CIA Renditionstatement17 March 2011Abu Omar
Obama to Aid Uzbek Dictatorshipwebpage9 November 2011Stephen Zunes
Secret detentions and illegal transfers of detainees involving Council of Europe member states: second reportwebpage11 June 2007Dick Marty
File:The Military and Halakhah.pdfpaper2006Dov Zakheim
The Rendition of Abu OmararticleAugust 2007John Foot
Torture Inquiry must reveal the Trutharticle7 July 2010Peter Oborne
Torture, Assassination and the American Way of Lifecommentary17 February 2012Jacob G. Hornberger
Two letters from Guantanamoletter14 February 2014Emad Abdalla Hassan
Shaker Aamer
Two letters from Shaker Aamer and Emad Hassan sent on the ocassion of the 12th anniversary of the establishment of America's extra-judicial hell-hole at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba..
== Rating ==
3star.png 17 July 2017 Robin  A thought provoking view on this topic.
Although far from complete, this page explains why torture is employed (not to gain reliable information, since it is not effective at this).


References

Facts about "Torture"
ConstitutesCrime +
DescriptionTorture is the deliberate infliction of pain, used both as a means of obtaining information (though for this purpose it is notoriously unreliable) and (such as at Guantánamo Bay) to terrorise entire populations. +
Display docTypeWikiSpooks Page +
Display imageFile:torture.jpg +
Display image2File:Torture.jpg +
Has averageRating3 +
Has fullPageNameTorture +
Has fullPageNameeTorture +
Has imageFile:Torture.jpg +
Has image2File:torture.jpg +
Has noRatings1 +
Has objectClassConcept +
Has objectClass2Concept +
Has revisionSize5,283 +
Has revisionUserRobin +
Has wikipediaPagehttps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/torture +
Has wikipediaPage2https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/torture +
Is not stubtrue +