Margot Wallström

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Person.png Margot Wallström  Rdf-icon.png
Margot Wallstrom.jpg
Born Margot Elisabeth Wallström
1954-09-28
Skellefteå, Sweden
Children 2
Spouse Håkan Wallström
Party Social Democrats

Employment.png Acting Deputy Prime Minister of Sweden Wikipedia-icon.png

In office
3 October 2014 - Present
Preceded by Jan Björklund

Employment.png Sweden/Foreign Minister Wikipedia-icon.png

In office
3 October 2014 - Present
Preceded by Carl Bildt

Employment.png First Vice President of the European Commission Wikipedia-icon.png

In office
22 November 2004 - 9 February 2010
Boss José Manuel Barroso
Succeeded by Catherine Ashton

Employment.png European Commissioner for the Environment

In office
13 September 1999 - 11 November 2004

Employment.png Minister for Nordic Cooperation

In office
25 May 2016 - Present

Employment.png Minister for Consumer Affairs

In office
4 October 1988 - 4 October 1991

Employment.png Member of the Riksdag

In office
19 September 1982 - 11 September 1999

Margot Wallström is Sweden's Minister of Foreign Affairs.

In May 2018, Margot Wallström appointed former ambassador Mathias Mossberg to chair an Inquiry into the release of documents in relation to the death of UN Secretary-General Dag Hammarskjöld:

“The UN and all its Member States must do everything they can to ascertain what actually happened in connection with Dag Hammarskjöld’s death in Ndola in 1961. We owe it to the families of those who died almost 57 years ago, to the United Nations as an organisation and to all those who work in Dag Hammarskjöld’s spirit today.”

Ambassador Mossberg is expected to submit his report in autumn 2018.[1]

European Union

In June 2016, Margot Wallström warned that other nations could follow the United Kingdom with referendums and demands for reform after the UK votes in the EU Referendum on 23 June.

“The spill-over effect will be unfortunately felt, deeply felt,” she said on the BBC's This Week's World programme.
"That might affect other EU member states that will say: 'Well if they can leave, maybe we should also have referendums and maybe we should also leave.’
"If they stay, it might also lead to other countries saying: 'Well, they negotiated, they asked and demanded to have a special treatment so why shouldn't we?'"[2]

Israel

In February 2016, Margot Wallström was reported to have suggested that an inquiry into a surge in Israel’s alleged extra-judicial killing of Palestinian demonstrators be held, after Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu called for a harsh response and told his police and soldiers that those opposed to the continued occupation of the West Bank were “terrorists.”

Almost immediately, the Israeli government denounced Wallström as engaging in “political stupidity”, banning her from travel to Israel, while one newspaper close to the government suggested that she might be assassinated, as fellow Swede Count Folke Bernadotte was by Jewish militants in 1948, because anti-Semitism appears to be in the Swedish DNA.[3]

Islamic State

On 20 November 2015, Wallström welcomed the adoption of the Security Council resolution on ISIL:

"Through the resolution, the international community agrees to enhance efforts to prevent and suppress ISIL's terrorist acts in accordance with international law. Sweden fully supports this. In the fight against "terrorism", it is vital to apply a broad approach. In addition to immediate responses, we must also address the root causes. It remains paramount to establish a process for reaching an inclusive and sustainable political solution to the conflict in Syria".[4]

Saudi Arabia

On 28 March 2015, Nick Cohen wrote in the Spectator:

"A few weeks ago Margot Wallström, the Swedish foreign minister, denounced the subjugation of women in Saudi Arabia. As the theocratic kingdom prevents women from travelling, conducting official business or marrying without the permission of male guardians, and as girls can be forced into child marriages where they are effectively raped by old men, she was telling no more than the truth. Wallström went on to condemn the Saudi courts for ordering that Raif Badawi receive ten years in prison and 1,000 lashes for setting up a website that championed secularism and free speech. These were ‘medieval methods’, she said, and a ‘cruel attempt to silence modern forms of expression’. And once again, who can argue with that?
"The backlash followed the pattern set by Rushdie, the Danish cartoons and Hebdo. Saudi Arabia withdrew its ambassador and stopped issuing visas to Swedish businessmen. The United Arab Emirates joined it. The Organisation of Islamic Cooperation, which represents 56 Muslim-majority states, accused Sweden of failing to respect the world’s ‘rich and varied ethical standards’ — standards so rich and varied, apparently, they include the flogging of bloggers and encouragement of paedophiles. Meanwhile, the Gulf Cooperation Council condemned her ‘unacceptable interference in the internal affairs of the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia’, and I wouldn’t bet against anti-Swedish riots following soon.
"Yet there is no ‘Wallström affair’. Outside Sweden, the western media has barely covered the story, and Sweden’s EU allies have shown no inclination whatsoever to support her. A small Scandinavian nation faces sanctions, accusations of Islamophobia and maybe worse to come, and everyone stays silent. As so often, the scandal is that there isn’t a scandal.[5]

 

Related Document

TitleTypePublication dateAuthor(s)Description
Document:Israel's International ConspiracyArticle9 February 2016Philip GiraldiWherever one goes – Western Europe, Canada, Australia, New Zealand and the United Statesthere is a well-organised and funded lobby ready, willing and able to go to war to protect Israel.


References