Tucker Carlson

From Wikispooks
Jump to navigation Jump to search

Person.png Tucker Carlson   Instagram Telegram Twitter WebsiteRdf-entity.pngRdf-icon.png
(journalist)
Tucker carlson.png
BornTucker Swanson McNear Carlson
16 May 1969
San Francisco
NationalityAmerican
Alma materSt. George's School (Rhode Island), Trinity College (Connecticut)
Relatives • William Fulbright
• Patricia Swanson
Interests • Politics
• Ivermectin
Interest of"Philip Cross"
American journalist and TV personality. Against COVID, but with a connection to the CIA and its operation in Nicaragua.

Employment.png Host

In office
2009 - Present
EmployerFox News
Host of Tucker Carlson Tonight from 2016

Employment.png Host of Tucker

In office
2005 - 2008
EmployerMSNBC

Employment.png Co-host of Crossfire

In office
2000 - 2005
EmployerCNN

Tucker Carlson is an American journalist who hosts Tucker Carlson Tonight on Fox News since 2016.

Political views

Carlson supports Julian Assange.[1]

He claims that the Biden Administration is using the NSA to spy on him.[2][3]

Advocacy of ivermectin.[4]

Background

Tucker Carlson was born into a wealthy California family in 1969. He attended a number of private preparatory schools in California and New England, including the exclusive St. George’s School in Rhode Island, where today attendance costs between $46,000 and $67,000 per year[5]. From there, he went on to study history at Trinity College, a private Connecticut liberal arts institution that charges similar fees.

His great-uncle was Arkansas Senator William Fulbright, while his step-mother, Patricia Swanson, is the heiress to the Swanson Frozen Food company fortune. In his earlier years, Carlson described himself as a trust-fund baby. “I’m extraordinarily loaded just from money I inherited from a number of trust funds,” he said in 2008.[6]

His father, Richard “Dick” Carlson was a deep state operative who was appointed by Ronald Reagan as director of the U.S. Information Agency (USIA), the CIA-close organization that oversees government-funded media, including Radio Free Europe/Radio Liberty, Radio and TV Martí and Voice of America, of which Richard was also the director.

Richard would later be appointed by President George H.W. Bush as U.S. Ambassador to the Seychelles and serve on a number of neoconservative think tanks. Chief among these is the Foundation for Defense of Democracies, an Israeli front organization.

Nicaragua

Alan Macleod made an analysis of Carlson's connections to the CIA and Nicaragua [7] While still in college Tucker and his roommate Neil Patel went to Nicaragua at least two times to, in Tucker’s own words, “get involved in the war and support the side that was right, which was not the Sandinista side.”[8] Carlson has rarely talked publicly about his time in Nicaragua, and never at any length.

Both Carlson and Patel returned in 1990 at the time of the presidential election, which pitted Sandinista Daniel Ortega against U.S.-backed, Contra-supporting candidate Violeta Chamorro. Thanks to years of U.S.-sponsored terror and a huge political war chest, Chamorro was able to win, becoming the sixth person in her family to hold the office. According to a 1990 edition of his college’s newsletter[9], Carlson and Patel attended “many [Chamorro] rallies.” In the National Review podcast, Carlson said that he was literally “standing next to her when she won.”

Not long after his second trip to Nicaragua that he formally applied[10] to become a member of the CIA. Little about this event is known, but it was reported that, after his apparent rejection, Dick suggested he take up journalism.

Attacking Gary Webb

The CIA funded its war against Nicaragua by helping the Contras to flood America’s Black urban centers with crack cocaine. This operation was revealed among others by Gary Webb in the The San Jose Mercury News.

The CIA started a campaign to contain the damage. Many friendly journalists, among them Tucker Carlson, who by 1996 was working for neocon publication The Weekly Standard, helped to sully Webb's name and hound him out of journalism.

In an article titled “A Disgraceful Newspaper Exposé and Its Fans,”[11] Carlson launched a wall-to-wall defense of the agency he had recently applied to join. Framing it all as a ludicrous accusation, he claimed that there was “no evidence” for Webb’s claims, and presented the CIA as a noble institution under unfair scrutiny and constant attack from forces inside the U.S. that wanted to bring it down. Far from engaging in the drug trade, he claimed that there is “ample evidence” that CIA officials had “moved to remove drug traffickers” from the “Nicaraguan resistance”.

A declassified CIA document cites his Weekly Standard article, among others, as aiding them in “managing a nightmare.”[12]



References