Luke Harding

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(Journalist)
Luke Harding.jpg
BornLuke Daniel Harding
21 April 1968
Alma materUniversity College (Oxford)

Luke Harding is a British journalist who is a foreign correspondent for The Guardian who was expelled from Russia in 2011. 'Blackcatte' referred to him as "the Guardian's #1 Russia-Hater".[1]

Expulsion from Russia

Harding and was based in Russia from 2007 until, returning from a stay in the UK on 5 February 2011, he was refused re-entry to Russia and deported back the same day.[2] The Guardian said his expulsion was linked to critical articles he wrote on Russia, a claim denied by the Russian government. After the reversal of the decision on 9 February 2011 and the granting of a short-term visa, Harding chose not to seek a further visa extension. His 2011 book "Mafia State" discusses his experience in Russia and the political system under Vladimir Putin.[3]

 

A Quote by Luke Harding

PageQuoteDateSource
Orbis Business Intelligence“The @Telegraph story claiming a link between Sergei #Skripal and Christopher Steele's company Orbis is wrong, I understand. Skripal had nothing to do with Trump dossier. Skripal had nothing to do with Trump dossier.”2018Twitter
 

Related Documents

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Document:Muellergate and the Discreet Lies of the BourgeoisieBlog post1 April 2019Craig MurrayThe capacity of the mainstream media repeatedly to promote the myth that Russia caused Clinton’s defeat, while never mentioning what the information was that had been so damaging to Hillary, should be alarming to anybody under the illusion that we have a working “free media”.
Document:Sputnik Gatecrashes Launch of Mark Urban's Book 'The Skripal Files'Article5 October 2018Kit Klarenberg
Johanna Ross
Sputnik Gatecrashes Launch of Mark Urban's Book 'The Skripal Files'
Document:The Assange Arrest is a Warning From HistoryArticle12 April 2019John PilgerLeni Riefenstahl, close friend of Adolf Hitler, whose films helped cast the Nazi spell over Germany told me that the message in her films, the propaganda, was dependent not on “orders from above” but on what she called the “submissive void” of the public: "When people no longer ask serious questions, they are submissive and malleable. Anything can happen.”
Document:Where They Tell You Not to Lookblog post30 April 2018Craig MurrayCraig Murray's rule number one of real investigative journalism: 1. Look Where They Tell You Not to Look


References

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