Fedricio Umberto D'Amato

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Person.png Fedricio Umberto D'Amato  Rdf-icon.png
(spook)
Born 1919
Marseille, France
Died 1 July 1996 (Age 77)
Nationality Italian
Founder of Club de Berne

Career

During World War II D'Amato worked for the US Office of Strategic Services. At the close of WWII was at the head of the North Atlantic Treaty Special Office, a link between NATO and the United States and assisted US intelligence in recruiting large numbers of officials from the Republic of Salò and from the Italian Special Forces, Decima MAS to operate in the newly founded Italian state. This recruitment program was heavily influenced by the desire to employ people with an unwavering anti-communist inclination. It included various figures such as Prince Valerio Borghese, Pino Rauti and Licio Gelli all of whom were involved in the spate of terrorist attacks in Cold War Italy which exposed Operation Gladio.[1]

D'Amato's later contact with the CIA was James Jesus Angleton, whom he described as "a truly extraordinary man, even to the point of being slightly crazy."[2]

D'Amato entered the Office for Reserved Affairs of the Italian of the Minister of Interior in 1957. In 1974, two days after the Piazza della Loggia bombing, he was removed from the position and assigned to the boundary police, although he kept a strong influence on the office until the 1980s. For his activity as the office's director (1969-1974) he has been accused of sidetracking numerous investigations about the massacres occurred in that period.[3]

D'Amato was a member of Propaganda 2 (P2), a secret masonic lodge which as a deep political milieu was implicated in numerous deep events in the 1970s. As part of the strategy of tension, he came up with the idea of having posters printed up by the tens of thousands and distributed for sticking up by Nazi-fascist groups.[4]

Founding the Club de Berne

Allan Francovich's 1992 film about Operation Gladio includes an admission by Umberto that "We did a lot in the field of security, especially on a European scale after the French 'evenements' or the revolution of '68. There was a real threat posed by subversive elements in Europe so I proposed we set up a permanent committee, a European committee. One which even Switzerland joined. Indeed this committee is even called the Berne Club... The club still exists and brings together the secret services of Europe together. Every time they meet because I was the founder they send a greeting to the 'godfather'. That's me."

Other activities

An acknowledged gastronome, he held a column in the weekly L'espresso, under the pseudonym of 'Federico Godio'.[5]

Fedricio Umberto D'Amato



References


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