University of Tennessee

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Group.png University of Tennessee  
(UniversityWebsiteRdf-entity.pngRdf-icon.png
University of Tennessee seal.png
MottoVeritatem cognoscetis et veritas te liberabit
(Latin)
Formation1794
HeadquartersTennessee, USA
TypeFlagship public university
Other nameVolunteers & Lady Volunteers
Significant ties to military research and deep state

The University of Tennessee (The University of Tennessee, Knoxville; UT Knoxville; UTK; or UT) is a public land-grant research university in Knoxville, Tennessee. Founded in 1794, two years before Tennessee became the 16th state, it is the flagship campus of the University of Tennessee system, with ten undergraduate colleges and eleven graduate colleges. It hosts more than 28,000 students from all 50 states and more than 100 foreign countries. It is classified among "R1: Doctoral Universities – Very high research activity".[1]

UT's ties to nearby Oak Ridge National Laboratory, established under UT President Andrew Holt and continued under the UT–Battelle partnership, allow for considerable research opportunities for faculty and students. Also affiliated with the university are the Howard H. Baker Jr. Center for Public Policy, the University of Tennessee Anthropological Research Facility, and the University of Tennessee Arboretum, which occupies 250 acres (100 ha) of nearby Oak Ridge and features hundreds of species of plants indigenous to the region. The university is a direct partner of the University of Tennessee Medical Center, which is one of two Level I trauma centers in East Tennessee.

The University of Tennessee is the only university in the nation to have three presidential papers editing projects. The university holds collections of the papers of all three U.S. presidents from Tennessee—Andrew Jackson, James K. Polk, and Andrew Johnson. Nine of its alumni have been selected as Rhodes Scholars and one alumnus, James M. Buchanan, received the 1986 Nobel Prize in Economics. UT is one of the oldest public universities in the United States and the oldest secular institution west of the Eastern Continental Divide.

Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Oak Ridge National Laboratory (abbreviated as ORNL) is an American multiprogram science and technology national laboratory sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and administered, managed, and operated by UT–Battelle as a federally funded research and development center (FFRDC) under a contract with the DOE. Established in 1942, ORNL is the largest science and energy national laboratory in the Department of Energy system (by size)[2] and third largest by annual budget.[3] ORNL is located in the Roane County section of the city of Oak Ridge, Tennessee. ORNL's scientific programs focus on materials, neutron science, energy, high-performance computing, systems biology and national security.

The laboratory has several of the world's top supercomputers; among these, Summit is ranked by the TOP500 as the world's second-most powerful supercomputer. The lab also is a leading neutron-science and nuclear-energy research facility that includes the Spallation Neutron Source and High Flux Isotope Reactor. ORNL hosts all of the following:

Nuclear Research

The city of Oak Ridge was established by the Army Corps of Engineers as part of the Clinton Engineer Works in 1942 on isolated farm land as part of the Manhattan Project.[6] During the war, advanced research for the government was managed at the site by the University of Chicago's Metallurgical Laboratory.[7] In 1943, construction of the "Clinton Laboratories" was completed, later renamed to "Oak Ridge National Laboratory". The site was chosen for the X-10 Graphite Reactor, used to show that plutonium can be created from enriched uranium. Enrico Fermi and his colleagues developed the world's second self-sustaining nuclear reactor after Fermi's previous experiment, the Chicago Pile-1. The X-10 was the first reactor designed for continuous operation. After the end of World War II the demand for weapons-grade plutonium fell and the reactor and the laboratory's 1000 employees were no longer involved in nuclear weapons.[8] Instead, it was used for scientific research. In 1946 the first medical isotopes were produced in the X-10 reactor, and by 1950 almost 20,000 samples had been shipped to various hospitals. As the demand for military science had fallen dramatically, the future of the lab was uncertain. Management of the lab was contracted by the US government to Monsanto; however, they withdrew in 1947. The University of Chicago re-assumed responsibility, until in December 1947, when Union Carbide and Carbon Co., which already operated two other facilities at Oak Ridge, took control of the laboratory. Alvin Weinberg was named Director of Research, ORNL, and in 1955 Director of the Laboratory.[9]

Genetic Engineering

Oak Ridge National Laboratory's biological research covers genomics, computational biology, structural biology and bioinformatics.[10] The BioEnergy Program aims to improve the efficiency of all stages of the biofuel process to improve the energy security of the United States.[11] The program aims to make genetic improvements to the potential biomass used,[12] formulate methods for refineries that can accept a diverse range of fuels and to improve the efficiency of energy delivery both to power plants and end users.[13][14]

The Center for Molecular Biophysics conducts research into the behaviour of biological molecules in various conditions. The center hosts projects that examine cell walls for biofuel production,[15] use neutron scattering to analyse protein folding and simulate the effect of catalysis on a conventional and quantum scale.[16][17]

Howard H. Baker Jr. Center for Public Policy

The Howard H. Baker, Jr. Center for Public Policy regularly holds events relative to the Center's three major areas of focus which are Energy & Environment, Global Security, and Leadership & Government. According to the Center's website, its missions is "to provide policy makers, citizens, scholars and students with the information and skills necessary to work effectively within our political system and to educate our local, state, national and global communities". The Center is housed in a 51,000 sq.ft., three-story domed building, which also serves as a gateway to the University of Tennessee campus and houses the Modern Political Archives (MPA), Chancellor's Honors Program and the Masters of Public Policy and Administration. The building also includes classrooms on the 2nd floor, MPA Research Room, Howard Baker Reading Room and Toyota Auditorium.

Howard H. Baker Jr. Center for Public Policy host The Institute for Nuclear Security, which brings the complete capabilities of the University community to bear on one of the most challenging issues of our time—nuclear security. Starting from 2015 the Institute has been publishing the International Journal of Nuclear Security that aims to share and promote research and best practices in all areas of nuclear security. It provides an open-access, multi-disciplinary forum for scholarship and discussion. The journal encourages diversity in theoretical foundations, research methods, and approaches, asking contributors to analyze and include implications for policy and practice.[18]


 

Alumni on Wikispooks

PersonBornDiedNationalitySummaryDescription
Howard Baker15 November 192526 June 2014USPolitician
Deep state operative
Bob Corker24 August 1952Politician
Businessperson
Arthur Culvahouse4 July 1948LawyerIran-Contra Counsel to U.S. President Ronald Reagan. Brookings Institution. Ambassador to Australia from 2019 to 2021.
Allen Elkins17 March 193121 December 2017USSpook
Soldier
CIA officer who worked for the agency for 35 years, including in the secret war in Laos and regime changes in the Dominican Republic
Chris Hadfield29 August 1959CanadaPilot
Astronaut
Canadian pilot and astronaut, presumably scouted at Bilderberg for a political career
Charles Holliday9 March 1948USBusinesspersonChemical and Oil executive; member of elite environmental organizations
Estes Kefauver26 July 190310 August 1963USPolitician


References