Piers Morgan

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(Television presenter, Writer, Journalist, Talk show host, Columnist)
Piers Morgan.jpg
Born Piers Stefan O'Meara
30 March 1965
Newick, Sussex, England
Nationality British
Alma mater Harlow College
Children • Spencer
• Stanley
• Albert
• Elise
Parents • Vincent Eamonn O'Meara
• Gabrielle Georgina Sybille (née Oliver)
Spouse Marion Shalloe

Piers Morgan (born 30 March 1965) is a British journalist and television personality currently working as the US editor-at-large for Mail Online and in the UK presenting Piers Morgan's Life Stories (2009–present) and Good Morning Britain (2015–present).[1]

Journalist

Piers Morgan began his career in Fleet Street as a writer and editor for several British tabloids, including The Sun, News of the World and the Daily Mirror. In 1994, aged 29, he was appointed editor of the News of the World by Rupert Murdoch, which made him the youngest editor of a national UK newspaper in more than half a century. In 1995 Morgan left to become editor of the Daily Mirror where he spent eight years. He was fired in May 2004 following publication of images – apparently showing abuse of Iraqi prisoners by British troops – that were later admitted to have been faked.[2]

Morgan is the editorial director of First News, a national newspaper for children published in the UK.

"Utterly unpersuasive"

In November 2012, Piers Morgan was heavily criticised in the official findings of the Leveson Inquiry, when Lord Leveson stated that comments made in Morgan's testimony about phone hacking were "utterly unpersuasive" and "clearly prove ... that he was aware that it was taking place in the press as a whole and that he was sufficiently unembarrassed by what was criminal behaviour that he was prepared to joke about it".[3]

TV personality

Piers Morgan was the winner of the US celebrity version of The Apprentice in 2008, vying for the title of Donald Trump's "Best Business Brain". He was eventually the overall winner, being named Celebrity Apprentice on 27 March, ahead of fellow finalist, American country music star Trace Adkins and having raised substantially more cash than all the other contestants combined.[4][5]

He began hosting Piers Morgan Live on CNN on 17 January 2011 replacing Larry King Live in the 9:00 pm timeslot following Larry King's retirement.[6] Piers Morgan Live was cancelled by CNN in February 2014 and aired its final broadcast on 28 March 2014.[7] Morgan is a former judge on America's Got Talent and Britain's Got Talent.[8]

Author

Piers Morgan has written eight books, including four volumes of memoirs.

  • Morgan, Piers; John Sachs (1991). Secret Lives. Blake. ISBN 0-905846-95-8.

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  • Morgan, Piers; John Sachs (1991). Private Lives of the Stars. Angus and Robertson. ISBN 0-207-16941-1.

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  • Morgan, Piers (1992). To Dream a Dream: Amazing Life of Phillip Schofield. Blake. ISBN 1-85782-006-1.

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  • Morgan, Piers (1993). "Take That": Our Story. Boxtree. ISBN 1-85283-839-6.

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  • Morgan, Piers (1994). "Take That": On the Road. Boxtree. ISBN 1-85283-396-3.

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  • Morgan, Piers (2004). Va Va Voom!: A Year with Arsenal 2003–04. Methuen. ISBN 0-413-77451-1.

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  • Morgan, Piers (2005). The Insider: The Private Diaries of a Scandalous Decade. Ebury Press. ISBN 0-09-190849-3.

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  • Morgan, Piers (2007). Don't You Know Who I am?. Ebury Press.

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  • Morgan, Piers (2009). God Bless America: Misadventures of a Big Mouth Brit. Ebury Press. ISBN 978-0-09-191393-9.

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  • Morgan, Piers (2013). Shooting Straight: Guns, Gays, God, and George Clooney. Gallery Books. ISBN 978-1-4767-4505-3.

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References

  1. Deans, Jason (30 September 2014). "Piers Morgan joins Mail Online as US editor-at-large". The Guardian. Retrieved 13 January 2015.

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  2. "Daily Mirror statement in full"
  3. Sweney, Mark (30 November 2012). "Piers Morgan claims over phone hacking branded 'utterly unpersuasive'". The Guardian. Retrieved 24 December 2012.

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  4. Johnson, Caitlin (28 March 2008). "Relative unknown wins 'Celebrity Apprentice'". Today. Retrieved 15 August 2012.

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  5. Schmidt, Veronica (28 March 2008). "Piers Morgan wins US Celebrity Apprentice but is branded 'evil'". The Times. Retrieved 8 June 2008.

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  6. "Piers Morgan is Larry King's CNN replacement", MSNBC, 8 September 2010; accessed 7 February 2014.
  7. "Piers Morgan's CNN show cancelled after 3 years". CBC News. 23 February 2014. Retrieved 24 February 2014.

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  8. Nudd, Tim. "Piers Morgan Leaving America's Got Talent". People. Retrieved 15 August 2012.

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