UK/Army

From Wikispooks
< UK(Redirected from UK Army)
Jump to navigation Jump to search

Group.png UK/Army  
(ArmyFacebook History Commons LinkedIn Twitter Website YouTubeRdf-entity.pngRdf-icon.png
British Army Logo.png
Formation1660
Typemilitary
Subgroups• 1 Military Working Dogs Reg
• 2 Operational Support Group
• 19 Tank Transporter Squadron
• 77 Brigade
• 81 Signals Squadron
• 167 Catering Support Regiment
• 170 (Infrastructure Support) Engineer Group
• 221 Wessex Battery
• 254 Specialist Group Information Services
• 255 TACP Battery
• 306 Hospital Support Medical Regt
• 335 Medical Evacuation Regt
• 412 Amphibious Troop
• 500 Communications troop
• AGC Education and Training Service Reserve
• Allied Rapid Reaction Corps Military Police Battalion
• Army Legal Service
• Central Reserves Headquarters Army Medical Services
• Defence Cultural Specialist Unit
• Joint Cyber Unit
• Land Information Assurance Group
• Force Research Unit
• JFIT
• Medical Operational Support Group
• Military Provost Staff
• National Reserves HQ Royal Artillery
• Special Air Service
• Special Boat Service
• Special Investigation Branch Regt
• Specialist Group Military Intelligence
• Special Reconnaissance Regiment
• Special Reconnaissance Unit
• Special Forces Support Group
Staff89,860
Exposed byStephen Frost, Rod Stoner
SubpageUK/Army/Intelligence Corps
The foreign enforcement arm of the UK government.

The UK Army, in numerical terms, is the fourth largest in the world.[1]

Subvertising

A subvertisement of an advertisement of the UK Army, encouraging suspicion of the "war on terror".

Morale

Over 15,000 soldiers quit the British Army in 2016 "as commanders struggled against falling morale".[2]

Propaganda

The Integrity Initiative has worked to try to promote Russophobia.

War crime allegations

Ian Cobain wrote for Middle East Eye in 2019 that:

“The British army operated rules of engagement in Iraq and Afghanistan that at times allowed soldiers to shoot unarmed civilians who were suspected of keeping them under surveillance, a Middle East Eye investigation has established.

The casualties included a number of children and teenage boys, according to several former soldiers interviewed by MEE.

Two former infantrymen allege that they and their fellow soldiers serving in southern Iraq were at one point told that they had permission to shoot anyone seen holding a mobile telephone, carrying a shovel, or acting in any way suspiciously.

The rules were relaxed, they say, in part because of concerns that unarmed individuals were acting as spotters for militants, or were involved in planting roadside bombs.[3]
Ian Cobain (4 February 2019)  [4]

 

Related Document

TitleTypePublication dateAuthor(s)Description
Document:Recruiting for Violence in the Militaryarticle1 April 2013Lesley Docksey


References