Larry A. Potts

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Person.png Larry A. Potts C-SPAN
(spook)
Larry A. Potts.jpg
Alma mater University of Richmond
Deputy FBI director, fired by Louis Freeh after Ruby Ridge.

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In office
July 1995 - 1997
Employer Federal Bureau of Investigation
"Training"?

Flag of the United States Federal Bureau of Investigation.svg Deputy Director of the Federal Bureau of Investigation Wikipedia-icon.png

In office
May 2, 1995 - July 1995
Preceded by Larry A. Potts
Demoted by the director, Louis Freeh.

Flag of the United States Federal Bureau of Investigation.svg Acting Deputy Director of the Federal Bureau of Investigation Wikipedia-icon.png

In office
February 1995 - May 2, 1995
Succeeded by Larry A. Potts

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In office
1974 - February 1995
Employer Federal Bureau of Investigation
Various roles.
Larry A. Potts, was Deputy Director of the Federal Bureau of Investigation until a high profile dismissal by his friend Louis Freeh after Ruby Ridge and Waco. He had no Wikipedia page as of May 2017.

Background

Larry Potts holds a B.A. in History and Psychology from the University of Richmond.[1]

FBI Career

After joining the FBI in 1974, Potts worked violent crimes, white-collar crimes and organized crime as a street agent. Later he held numerous management positions in the FBI, including Assistant Director in Charge of the Criminal Investigative Division and Deputy Director.[2][3] A New York Times article on his demotion stated that he was "once the bureau's fastest-rising star".[4]

Demotion

Potts was demoted by his friend Louis Freeh after controversy surrounding the events of Ruby Ridge and Waco. He received a letter of censure for failure to provide proper oversight with regard to the rules of engagement employed at Ruby Ridge. "Rogers acknowledged that the Rules of Engagement he proposed specified that any adult with a weapon observed in the vicinity of the Weaver cabin or in the firefight area "could and should be the subject of deadly force." [FN534] According to Rogers he discussed this rule with FBI Assistant Director Larry Potts who concurred fully" Also involved in Waco. ... is now working for Investigative Group International (IGI), a private firm retained by President Clinton to investigate judges, reporters, and other potential enemies of his administration (according to a deposition of IGI director Terry Lenzner). Within the FBI, these special people are called "FOL" - Friends of Louie. [NYT 5/11/97][5] Some of his testimony into the investigations into the two events is available from C-SPAN.[6]

Later activities

In 1997 Potts retired from the FBI and joined the Investigative Group International, a Washington, D.C. based security consulting company, as the Executive Vice President.

He served as the Chief of the Public Corruption Unit where he developed guidelines for conducting public corruption investigations. He was named Inspector-In-Charge of the VANPAC Task Force involving the mail bombing deaths of a Federal judge and a civil rights attorney. He supervised that multi-agency task force of several hundred investigators, which resulted in the successful prosecution of the individual responsible.

Potts has worked for the Scientific Games Corporation since September 2004, and became both Chief Compliance Officer and Director of Security there in February 2006.[1]



References