Gina Miller

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Person.png Gina Miller   LinkedIn TwitterRdf-icon.png
(Businesswoman)
Gina Miller.png
Born Gina Nadira Singh
19 April 1965
British Guiana
Alma mater University of London
Children 3
Spouse Alan Miller
Interests Brexit

Employment.png Founding Partner

In office
February 2009 - Present
Employer SCM Private

Gina Miller, philanthropist and co-founder of the London-based investment fund manager SCM Private, is the lead claimant in a legal challenge to Brexit.

Background

Gina Miller, who was born in Guyana but spent most of her life in the UK, studied law, went into modeling and now owns the investment fund SCM Private with her husband Alan Miller.[1]

Business

Miller has campaigned in the past to expose hidden charges in the industry, where she earned the nickname "black widow spider," according to an interview she gave the Financial Times in April 2016:

“That nickname is wrong on so many levels. But I do not and will not let other people bring me down. I believe that level of abuse means I am doing something right for investors.”
“People say I am not collegiate. If the industry — the task forces, the councils and the authors of research papers — really wanted change, we would have had it by now. The regulator published a paper on fund fees in 2000. So why are we still talking about it 16 years later?
“How many millions of people have lost money and can’t live a decent retired life because of those 16 years? No, I am not interested in being collegiate. I don’t mind being a lone figure.”[2]

SCM Private

From Gina Miller's entry on Linkedin:

SCM Private is a modern innovative investment manager, solely investing in Exchange Traded Products (ETPs), that focuses on asset allocation to consistent performance by minimising market volatility and maximise returns. We believe in simplicity, transparency and being completely aligned with clients. Our successful asset allocation relies on a contrarian mindset combined with a common sense application of traditional investment valuation yardsticks.
Since launching in June 2009 SCM Private has proven that a hybrid actively passive approach fulfilled purely with ETPs can provide investors with consistent performance and a robust alternative to traditional active investment products. With large sums of the founders' own money invested along side clients', on exactly the same terms and fees, we only make investment decisions we feel are best for us and for our clients.[3]

Brexit challenge

Miller challenged Theresa May’s bid to avoid a parliamentary vote on triggering Brexit, arguing that using the Royal Prerogative to invoke Article 50 to leave the European Union without asking MPs to approve it is unconstitutional.[4]

Crowdfunding

Miller launched the Brexit legal case along with Brazilian-born British hairdresser Deir Dos Santos and the People's Challenge group, set up by Grahame Pigney and backed by a crowd-funding campaign. Three London law firms - Mishcon de Reya, Edwin Coe and Bindmans - agreed to take up the case:[5]

“We will be making the argument that the correct constitutional process of parliamentary scrutiny and approval - as well as consultation with the devolved administrations in Scotland and Northern Ireland and the Welsh Assembly - needs to be followed. Otherwise the notice to withdraw from the European Union would be unlawful and subject to legal challenge.”[6]

Bindmans' John Halford said:

“The oversight, control and democratic accountability needed for decisions on Brexit have to match the consequences of those decisions for UK citizens. That is why our constitution empowers Parliament, not the government, to take these decisions. The People’s Challenge group and thousands of backers unhesitatingly committed to defending Parliament’s sovereignty. They have prevailed so far and will resist the anticipated government appeal in the Supreme Court.”[7]

November 2016 ruling

On 3 November 2016, Lord Chief Justice Thomas and two other senior judges agreed the UK Prime Minister does not have the power to trigger Article 50 without a vote from Parliament.[8]

Statement

Speaking outside the High Court, Gina Miller said she was “delighted” by the decision and hoped the Government would “make the wise decision of not appealing”:

“This result today is about all of us: our United Kingdom and our futures.
“It is not about how any of us voted – each of us voted to do what we believed was the right thing for our country.
“This case is about process, not politics. My dedicated legal team are, alongside myself and my supporters, pleased to have played our part in helping form a debate on whether the rights conferred on UK citizens through Parliament legislation 44 years ago could be casually snuffed out by the executive without Parliament or our elected representatives and without proper prior consultation about the Government’s intentions for Brexit.
“However you voted on 23 June, we all owe it to our country to uphold the highest standards of transparency and democratic accountability that we are admired and respected for around the world.
“Thank you very much.”[9]

Political reaction

Scotland's First Minister Nicola Sturgeon said that Holyrood could join Miller and Dos Santos as "participants in that case" when it goes to the UK Supreme Court on 5 December 2016:[10]

"We should remember that their refusal to allow a vote in the House of Commons is not because of some matter of high constitutional principle, it is because they don't have a coherent position and they know that if they take their case to the (chamber) that will be exposed."

Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn said:

"This ruling underlines the need for the Government to bring its negotiating terms to Parliament without delay.
"Labour respects the decision of the British people to leave the European Union. But there must be transparency and accountability to Parliament on the terms of Brexit."[11]

 

Related Documents

TitleTypePublication dateAuthor(s)Description
Document:Project BrexitComment24 June 2017DavidProject Brexit: "Doomed to Failure"
Document:Richmond Park prospective candidate: I would vote against Article 50 in ParliamentStatement4 November 2016Christian WolmarStatement by Labour Party prospective parliamentary candidate Christian Wolmar who aims to win the 2016 Richmond Park by-election


References