Counter Extremism Project

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Group.png Counter Extremism Project  
(Front organization, NGOC-SPAN Facebook Website YouTubeRdf-entity.pngRdf-icon.png
Counter Extremism Project Logo.png
FormationSeptember 22, 2014
LeaderMark Wallace
SubgroupsOne95
Interests“extremism”, “violent extremism”, “non-violent extremism”, internet censorship
Membership• Frances F. Townsend
• David Ibsen
• Lara Pham
• Hans-Jakob Schindler
• Elliott Abrams
• Ian Acheson
• Munir Akram
• Cresencio Arcos
• Irwin Cotler
• Lucinda Creighton
• Martha Crenshaw
• Liam Duffy
• Hany Farid
• Debbi Gordon
• August Hanning
• Robert Hill
• Raymond W. Kelly
• Gilles de Kerchove
• Joseph I. Lieberman
• Jesse Morto
• Magnus Ranstorp
• Kacper Rekawek
• Alexander Ritzmann
• Ivor Roberts
• Dennis Ross
• Nathan Sales
• Gary Samore
• Radoslaw Sikorski
• Mitchell Silber
• Guido Steinberg
• Daniel Thelesklaf
• Róbert Vass
• Alejandro D. Wolff
• Michael Garcia
Thinly veiled intelligence front organization to implement internet censorship

The Counter Extremism Project is a thinly veiled intelligence service front group. Its main activity seems to be to develop and promote tools for internet censorship, with the pretext of combating the very same groups the services are covertly supporting.

Official narrative

The Project is a non-profit non-governmental organization that combats extremist groups "by pressuring financial support networks, countering the narrative of extremists and their online recruitment, and advocating for strong laws, policies and regulations".[1]

Most of the members are neoconservatives. The group is modeled after United Against Nuclear Iran, an deep state advocacy group led by Mark Wallace that succeeded in increasing economic pressure on the Iran.[2]

Activities

Digital Disruption Campaign

CEP launched its "Digital Disruption Campaign" to remove accounts associated with ISIS from social media networks in order to deny them popular platforms to incite violence, spread their ideas and recruit members. The campaign has particularly focused on Twitter, calling on the company to adopt new policies to prevent extremists such as ISIS from misusing their platform, as well as identifying ISIS accounts and alerting Twitter to remove them.[3] ISIS has made extensive use of social media, especially Twitter, to recruit fighters and to distribute propaganda videos, including clips that show the decapitation of American journalists and a British foreign aid official. The campaign has led to online death threats such as beheading against the CEP president Frances Townsend on Twitter, allegedly from genuine jihadist accounts.[4]

The "disruption" campaign happened at the same time as the US and British deep state covertly was making propaganda for ISIS and associated groups,[citation needed] and at the same time the same intelligence services financed and armed these groups

Qatar

In 2017, the group accused Qatar of providing funds to "terrorist" groups.[5]

 

Employee on Wikispooks

EmployeeJob
Ivor RobertsAdvisory board member


References