Andrew Lansley

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Person.png Andrew Lansley  
Born 1956-12-11
Hornchurch, England
Alma mater University of Exeter
Religion Anglicanism
Children 5
Spouse Marilyn Biggs
Party Conservative,  Social Democrat
Website http://www.andrewlansley.co.uk

Employment.png Leader of the House of Commons Wikipedia-icon.png

In office
4 September 2012 - 14 July 2014
Preceded by George Young
Succeeded by William Hague

Employment.png Lord Privy Seal Wikipedia-icon.png

In office
4 September 2012 - 14 July 2014
Preceded by George Young

Employment.png Secretary of State for Health Wikipedia-icon.png

In office
12 May 2010 - 4 September 2012
Preceded by Andy Burnham
Succeeded by Jeremy Hunt

Employment.png Shadow Secretary of State for Health Wikipedia-icon.png

In office
19 June 2004 - 11 May 2010
Succeeded by Andy Burnham

Employment.png Shadow Minister for the Cabinet Office

In office
15 June 1999 - 18 September 2001
Andrew Lansley is Secretary of State for Health.[1]

On diet legislation and trans fats

According to a July 2010 report in the Daily Mail, Lansley rejected the advice of official health watchdog NICE on the issue of dangerous trans fats in food and sided with the food industry – which argues a ban is unnecessary. It is estimated that trans fats are responsible for as many as 7,000 premature deaths a year.[2]

In a separate announcement, Lansley told the British Medical Association the Government was likely to opt out of legislating on health and diet.[3]

Lansley also took the opportunity to criticize chef Jamie Oliver's campaign to make school meals healthier. Lansley said it was wrong to lecture people on what they should eat and argued the efforts of Jamie Oliver to tackle child obesity and ill-health had failed.[4]

Oliver replied to Lansley by saying:

To say school dinners hasn't worked is not just inaccurate, but is also an insult to the hard work of hundreds of thousands of dinner ladies, teachers, headteachers and parent helpers who strive to feed schoolkids a nutritious, hot meal for 190 days of the year.[5]

Oliver added that any problems were due to there being too little funding available to train school catering staff properly.

Funding for healthier ingredients has also been an issue. When Oliver began his school meals campaign in 2005, the amount typically spent on ingredients for a school meal was between 35p and 45p per day per child. This compared with an average of 60p per lunch spent on inmates by the prison service.[6]

Affiliations

External Resources



References

  1. Her Majesty’s Government, Number10.gov.uk, accessed 12 May 2010.
  2. Sean Poulter, They kill 7,000 people a year, but trans fats won't be banned, Daily Mail, 1 July 2010
  3. Sean Poulter, They kill 7,000 people a year, but trans fats won't be banned, Daily Mail, 1 July 2010, acc 5 July 2010
  4. Sean Poulter, They kill 7,000 people a year, but trans fats won't be banned, Daily Mail, 1 July 2010, acc 5 July 2010
  5. Denis Campbell, Jamie Oliver hits back at health secretary over school meals 'insult', Guardian, 30 Jun 2010, acc 5 July 2010
  6. School Dinners - The future’s looking brighter, Optimum Nutrition Magazine, Summer 2005, acc 4 Jul 2010