Difference between revisions of "John Harvey-Jones"

From Wikispooks
Jump to navigation Jump to search
m (Text replacement - "|twitter= " to "")
 
(One intermediate revision by the same user not shown)
Line 11: Line 11:
 
|employment=
 
|employment=
 
}}
 
}}
 +
 +
 +
'''Sir John Harvey-Jones''' (16 April 1924 – 9 January 2008) was a British intelligence officer, media operative and businessman.
 +
 +
==Early life==
 +
He spent most of his early childhood in Dhar, India, where his father, Mervyn Stockton Harvey-Jones (né Harvey), a former Captain in the Indian Army and bank employee, was guardian and tutor to a teenage maharajah. (This type of minding of a puppet ruler hints that already John's father had intelligence connections).
 +
 +
==Royal Navy career and Intelligence leader==
 +
 +
Harvey-Jones joined Dartmouth Royal Naval College as a cadet in 1937, and in 1940, at the age of 16, he joined HMS Diomede as a midshipman. The next two ships that he served with, HMS Ithuriel and HMS Quentin, were sunk by enemy action. Harvey-Jones went on to join the submarine service in 1942, and received his first command at age 24.
 +
 +
With the end of World War II, Harvey-Jones went to the University of Cambridge to learn Russian in six months and joined British [[Naval Intelligence]] as an interpreter. He married Mary Bignell in 1947, and he commanded the Russian intelligence section under the guise of the "British Baltic Fishery Protection Service", which used two ex-German E-boats for gathering clandestine intelligence on the Soviet Baltic Fleet. Harvey-Jones rose to the rank of lieutenant-commander.
 +
 +
==Business Career==
 +
 +
He -  officially - resigned his commission in 1956 and joined [[Imperial Chemical Industries]] (ICI) on Teeside as a junior training manager. In 1973, at age 49, he was promoted to sit on the main board of directors. In April 1982, he became chairman of ICI, only the second split-career man and non-chemist to reach the top.
 +
 +
In 1989, he became chairman of [[The Economist]], was a non-executive director of Grand Metropolitan plc (now part of Diageo), and honorary vice-president of the Institute of Marketing. Harvey-Jones was also chairman of the Burns-Anderson Group plc, a conglomerate spanning merchant banking, financial services, recruitment, marketing and business services, and stockbroking.
 +
 +
In 1952 he was awarded a military MBE for his work in [[Naval Intelligence]], although his citation stated that the award was for "fishery protection duties in the Baltic".
 +
 +
On behalf of ICI, he participated in the 1983 foundation meeting of [[European Round Table of Industrialists]]
 +
 
{{SMWDocs}}
 
{{SMWDocs}}
 
==References==
 
==References==
 
{{reflist}}
 
{{reflist}}
 
{{Stub}}
 
{{Stub}}

Latest revision as of 06:10, 11 October 2019

Person.png John Harvey-Jones  Rdf-icon.png
(mariner, spook, businessman)
John Harvey-Jones.jpg
Born16 April 1924
Hackney, London, England
Died2008-01-09 (Age 83)
Hereford, Herefordshire, England, UK


Sir John Harvey-Jones (16 April 1924 – 9 January 2008) was a British intelligence officer, media operative and businessman.

Early life

He spent most of his early childhood in Dhar, India, where his father, Mervyn Stockton Harvey-Jones (né Harvey), a former Captain in the Indian Army and bank employee, was guardian and tutor to a teenage maharajah. (This type of minding of a puppet ruler hints that already John's father had intelligence connections).

Royal Navy career and Intelligence leader

Harvey-Jones joined Dartmouth Royal Naval College as a cadet in 1937, and in 1940, at the age of 16, he joined HMS Diomede as a midshipman. The next two ships that he served with, HMS Ithuriel and HMS Quentin, were sunk by enemy action. Harvey-Jones went on to join the submarine service in 1942, and received his first command at age 24.

With the end of World War II, Harvey-Jones went to the University of Cambridge to learn Russian in six months and joined British Naval Intelligence as an interpreter. He married Mary Bignell in 1947, and he commanded the Russian intelligence section under the guise of the "British Baltic Fishery Protection Service", which used two ex-German E-boats for gathering clandestine intelligence on the Soviet Baltic Fleet. Harvey-Jones rose to the rank of lieutenant-commander.

Business Career

He - officially - resigned his commission in 1956 and joined Imperial Chemical Industries (ICI) on Teeside as a junior training manager. In 1973, at age 49, he was promoted to sit on the main board of directors. In April 1982, he became chairman of ICI, only the second split-career man and non-chemist to reach the top.

In 1989, he became chairman of The Economist, was a non-executive director of Grand Metropolitan plc (now part of Diageo), and honorary vice-president of the Institute of Marketing. Harvey-Jones was also chairman of the Burns-Anderson Group plc, a conglomerate spanning merchant banking, financial services, recruitment, marketing and business services, and stockbroking.

In 1952 he was awarded a military MBE for his work in Naval Intelligence, although his citation stated that the award was for "fishery protection duties in the Baltic".

On behalf of ICI, he participated in the 1983 foundation meeting of European Round Table of Industrialists


16 April 1924|9 January 2008| 

Event Participated in

EventStartEndLocation(s)
Bilderberg/197821 April 197823 April 1978US
New Jersey
Princeton University


References


57px-Notepad icon.png This is a page stub. Please add to it.