Terrorism/Response

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Concept.png Terrorism/ResponseRdf-icon.png

The response to "terrorism" has been remarkably uniform in nature, as governments around the world have used the fear (or acquiescence) of their populace to introduce laws and other technology that facilitate mass surveillance of the citizenry.

Examples

JFK/Assassination

After the Assassination of John F. Kennedy, surveillance was increased[How?], notwithstanding the claim by the Warren Commission that the perpetrator had acted alone.

September 11, 2001

Full article: Rated 4/5 9-11

The Patriot Act empowered the FBI to install the online mass surveillance system known as CARNIVORE (later as DCS 1000) at all ISPs.

2001 Anthrax attacks

After the 2001 Anthrax Attacks the United States Postal Service instigated the Mail Isolation Control and Tracking Program. This was hidden from the public for 12 years until cited by the FBI in its investigation of April 2013 ricin letters. Under the program, the US Postal Service computers photograph the exterior of every piece of paper mail that is processed in the United States — about 160 billion pieces in 2012. These images are kept indefinitely so that mail correspondence can be the can retroactively tracked at the request of law enforcement.

2002

Full article: 2002 Bali bombings

On 12 October 2002, two bombs were detonated in a tourist area in Bali, Indonesia. 202 people were killed, mostly tourists from Australia or Europe. The Australian Government promptly introduced laws that required all ISPs in Australia to collect and monitor the data passing through their servers. Meanwhile, in the Telecommunications Interception Legislation Amendment Bill of 2002 it granted its agencies powers to intercept and read email, SMS and voice-mail messages without a warrant.

2005 London Bombings

After 9/11, John Ashcroft granted the FBI the authority to gather information on the Internet users outside official investigations and to initiate online surveillance on the basis of a priori suspicion. Originally passed as a temporary law, this Act was made permanent in the aftermath of the 2005 London bombings.



References


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