Patrick Dean

From Wikispooks
Jump to navigation Jump to search

Person.png Patrick Dean   KeywikiRdf-entity.pngRdf-icon.png
(diplomat)
Patrick Dean and Lyndon B. Johnson.png
Patrick Dean and Lyndon B. Johnson
BornPatrick Henry Dean
1909-03-16
Berlin, Germany
Died1994-11-05 (Age 85)
Kingston, Surrey
NationalityBritish Subject
Alma materRugby School, Gonville and Caius College Cambridge, Lincoln's Inn
SpousePatricia Wallace Jackson
British Ambassador to the United States, connection to the intelligence apparatus.

Sir Patrick Henry Dean [1] was Permanent Representative of the United Kingdom to the United Nations from 1960 to 1964 and British Ambassador to the United States from 1965 to 1969. He was also a chairman of the Joint Intelligence Committee.[2]

Early life and background

Patrick Henry Dean was born in Berlin, Germany, to Henry Roy Dean, (1879–1961), a professor of Pathology at the University of Cambridge, and his wife, Irene Wilson (1875–1959), the daughter of Charles Arthur Wilson. Henry Roy Dean was a member of the MacCormac family and was the maternal grandson of Dr Henry MacCormac and the nephew of Sir William MacCormac.

After education at Cambridge, he was called to the Bar by Lincoln's Inn, and he attempted to secure a career at the Bar in London, but was unsuccessful, and as a result he joined the Civil Service. He became a legal adviser to the Foreign office. In that capacity, Dean served as a legal adviser at the Yalta Conference in February 1945, dealing with the repatriation of Soviet prisoners and displaced persons, many of the involuntary, and at the Potsdam Conference, in July and August 1945.[3]

After the Second World War, Dean was head of the German Political Department (Foreign Office) in the Foreign Ministry between 1946 and 1949, attached to the British Control Commission in occupied Germany, which reformatted the German political system.[4] He also served as an adviser during the postwar Nuremberg trials of German war criminals (as part of the trials, the British tried to protect "their men" from prosecution).

After that he was first counselor to the embassy in 1949 and then from 1950 to 1952 envoy to the embassy in Italy.

After he was Senior Civilian Instructor (Senior Civilian Instructor) at Imperial Defense College in London from 1952 to 1953, he then served in the Foreign Office from 1953 to 1956 as Assistant Under-Secretary for Foreign Affairs (Defense and Intelligence)). He then held the post of Deputy Under-Secretary for Foreign Affairs (Defense) in the Foreign Ministry from 1956 to 1960. During this use he was knighted on June 13, 1957 as Knight Commander of the Order of St Michael and St George (KCMG), so that from then on he carried the suffix "Sir".

As the successor to Pierson John Dixon, Sir Patrick Dean took over the post of Permanent Representative of the United Kingdom to the United Nations in 1960 and held it until 1964, when Hugh Foot, Baron Caradon, succeeded him there.

As last post, he replaced David Ormsby-Gore, 5th Baron Harlech, as ambassador to the United States in 1965 and remained in this position until he left the diplomatic service in 1969, after which John Freeman was his successor.

As British ambassador to Washington, Dean was occupied with difficulties over Vietnam and British military commitments East of Suez.[5] He helped to promote greater mutual understanding between the two governments, but faced a president who had a negative attitude to foreign diplomats.[6]

After his retirement, Dean was director of the construction company Taylor Woodrow from 1969 to 1986 and at the same time international advisor to the financial services company American Express between 1969 and 1993. He was also a consultant for the construction company Taylor Woodrow from 1986 to 1993.



References

  1. http://www.ukwhoswho.com/view/article/oupww/whowaswho/U172035
  2. https://books.google.com/?id=_jcdkeu2nLwC&pg=PA117&dq=patrick+dean+chairman+of+the+joint
  3. https://www.nytimes.com/1994/11/16/obituaries/sir-patrick-dean-of-britain-85-envoy-to-un-and-washington.html
  4. https://www.nytimes.com/1994/11/16/obituaries/sir-patrick-dean-of-britain-85-envoy-to-un-and-washington.html
  5. Colman, Jonathan (2007). "'Dealing with disillusioned men': The Washington Ambassadorship of Sir Patrick Dean, 1965–69". Contemporary British History. 21 (2): 247–270.
  6. Colman, Jonathan (2007). "'Dealing with disillusioned men': The Washington Ambassadorship of Sir Patrick Dean, 1965–69". Contemporary British History. 21 (2): 247–270.