Ole Myrvoll

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Person.png Ole Myrvoll  Rdf-entity.pngRdf-icon.png
(economist, academic)
OLMY stort.jpg
Born18 May 1911
Died16 July 1988 (Age 77)
NationalityNorwegian
Alma materUniversity of Virginia, Oslo Commerce School
Liberal Norwegian economist

Employment.png Norway/Minister of Finance

In office
12 October 1965 - 17 March 1971

Employment.png Norway/Minister of Pay and Prices

In office
28 August 1963 - 25 September 1963

Employment.png Member of the Norwegian Parliament

In office
1 October 1973 - 30 September 1977
Preceded byJens Haugland

Ole Myrvoll was a Norwegian professor in economy and politician for the Liberal Party and later, after a party split, the Liberal People's Party.

He was a deputy representative to the Norwegian Parliament from Bergen during the terms 1965–1969 and 1969–1973. From August to September 1963 he was Minister of Wages and Prices during the short-lived centre-right cabinet Lyng. He became Minister of Finance from 1965 to 1971 during the cabinet Borten. In December 1972, Myrvoll joined the New People's Party which split from the Liberal Party over disagreements of Norway's proposed entry to the European Economic Community. He was elected to Norwegian Parliament for this party in 1973, this time from Hordaland as Bergen had ceased to be a county and as such constituency.[1]

On the local level Myrvoll was a member of the executive committee of Bergen city council from 1947 to 1955 and 1974 to 1975. He was mayor from 1972 to 1973.

An economist by profession, he graduated with a cand.oecon. degree in 1935, and with an MA degree from the University of Virginia in 1937. He was hired as a research fellow at the Norwegian School of Economics and Business Administration in 1942, and was given the professorate following his doctorate degree in 1957 at the same school.

 

Event Participated in

EventStartEndLocation(s)Description
Bilderberg/197419 April 197421 April 1974France
Hotel Mont d' Arbois
Megève
The 23rd Bilderberg, held in the UK


References