Michael Havers

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Person.png Michael Havers   Powerbase SourcewatchRdf-icon.png
Born1923-03-10
Died1992-04-01 (Age 69)
Alma materCambridge University
Children • Philip
• Nigel
SpouseCarol Elizabeth Lay
PartyConservative

Employment.png Lord High Chancellor of Great Britain Wikipedia-icon.png

In office
13 June 1987 - 26 October 1987
Preceded byQuintin Hogg

Employment.png Attorney General for England and Wales Wikipedia-icon.png

In office
6 May 1979 - 13 June 1987
Succeeded byPatrick Mayhew

Employment.png Attorney General for Northern Ireland

In office
6 May 1979 - 13 June 1987
Succeeded byPatrick Mayhew

Employment.png Shadow Attorney General Wikipedia-icon.png

In office
18 February 1975 - 4 May 1979

Employment.png Solicitor General for England and Wales Wikipedia-icon.png

In office
5 November 1972 - 4 March 1974
Preceded byGeoffrey Howe

Employment.png Member of Parliament for Wimbledon

In office
18 June 1970 - 11 June 1987

Employment.png Lord Chancellor Wikipedia-icon.png

In office
13 June 1987 - 26 October 1987
Preceded byQuintin Hogg

Decision not to prosecute Peter Hayman

In April 1981 as UK Attorney General, Sir Michael Havers stated in parliament that while Peter Hayman was a member of the Paedophile Information Exchange, he was never a member of the executive committee, so was not prosecuted as others were for publishing contact advertisements.[1][2]

Role in the Guildford Four and Maguire Family miscarriages of justice

Havers represented the Crown in two of the most notable miscarriages of justice in British judicial history:[3] the trial and appeal of the Guildford Four and also of the Maguire family (known as the Maguire Seven), all of whom were wrongfully convicted. Collectively, they served a total of 113 years in prison and one of the Maguire Seven, Giuseppe Conlon, died in prison, convicted on the basis of discredited forensic evidence.[4]

In the case of the Guildford Four, the Director of Public Prosecutions was found to have suppressed alibi evidence that supported Gerry Conlon and Paul Hill’s claims of innocence.[5] The Director of Public Prosecutions, for which Havers was acting, was also found to have suppressed confessions by Provisional IRA bombers, known as the Balcombe Street Gang that they had carried out the Guildford and Woolwich bombings.

In his submission to Sir John May's Inquiry into the Guildford and Woolwich bombings in 1989 Labour MP Chris Mullin cast doubt on Havers’s integrity in the matter:[6]

Sir Michael Havers represented the Crown at the trials of the Guildford Four, Mrs. Maguire and her family and at the re-trial/appeal of the Guildford Four. He is, therefore, probably the person who can lay claim to the most detailed knowledge of this affair. I respectfully submit that any inquiry that passed without the benefit of his experience would be deficient....
The only hope of sustaining the original convictions was to rewrite the script from top to bottom. This Sir Michael and his colleagues proceeded to do with ingenuity and relish.


10 March 1923|1 April 1992|


References

  1. "Why Sir Peter Hayman was not named". The Times. London. 7 April 1981. Retrieved 2 July 2014. through his membership of PIE or otherwisePage Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css must have content model "Sanitized CSS" for TemplateStyles (current model is "plain text").
  2. Colin Brown (7 April 1981). "Havers denies special treatment for Hayman". The Guardian. Retrieved 2 July 2014. Sir Peter was a member of the Paedophile Information ExchangePage Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css must have content model "Sanitized CSS" for TemplateStyles (current model is "plain text").
  3. Guardian: After 16 years of waiting, an apology at last for the Guildford Four
  4. New Scientist: Faulty forensic testing convicted Maguire Seven
  5. New York Times Letter: Sins of the Guildford Four Prosecution
  6. Evidence to Sir John May's Inquiry into the Guildford and Woolwich bombings - 1989