University of Aix-en-Provence

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Group.png University of Aix-en-Provence  
(UniversityWebsiteRdf-entity.pngRdf-icon.png
Aix-Marseille University logo.png
Formation1409
HeadquartersProvence, France
TypePublic
The largest university in the French-speaking world

Aix-Marseille University is a public research university located in the Provence region of southern France. The university is organized around five main campuses situated in Aix-en-Provence and Marseille.[1]

AMU has produced many notable alumni in the fields of law, politics, business, science, academia, and arts. To date, there have been four Nobel Prize laureates amongst its alumni and faculty,[2][3][4][5] as well as a two-time recipient of the Pulitzer Prize,[6] multiple heads of state or government, parliamentary speakers, government ministers, ambassadors and members of the constituent academies of the Institut de France.

History

It was founded in 1409 when Louis II of Anjou, Count of Provence, petitioned the Pisan Antipope Alexander V to establish the University of Provence.[7] The university came into its current form following a merger of the University of Provence, the University of the Mediterranean and Paul Cézanne University.[8][9][10] The merger became effective on 1 January 2012, resulting in the creation of the largest university in the French-speaking world, with about 80,000 students.[11] AMU has the largest budget of any academic institution in the Francophone world, standing at €750 million.[12]


 

Alumni on Wikispooks

PersonBornNationalitySummaryDescription
Sylvie Goulard6 December 1964FrancePolitician
Central banker
French politician who attended the 2016 Bilderberg. Deputy Governor of the Bank of France since 2018
Peter Hambro18 January 1945UKBusinessperson
Jim Hoagland22 January 1940USJournalistUS journalist whose Deep state connections include the CFR, Hoover Institution, Institute for Strategic Dialogue and 4 visits to the Bilderberg


References