Kincora Boys' Home

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Widely alleged to be the scene of institutionalised child sexual abuse, probably by the deep state.

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The Kincora Boys' Home (1958-1980) has been widely alleged as a venue used for purposes of organised child sexual abuse, for purposes of sexual blackmail.

1981 Arrests

In 1981 three employees of Kincora Boys' Home were jailed after admitting charges of buggery, indecent assault and gross indecency with the boys in their care. Reports then appeared in the press that Kincora was the centre of an "establishment" vice ring[1].

Exposure

The cover of the issue #1 of the Lobster magazine, published in September 1983, was a story by Stephen Dorril entitled Kincoragate, which began with the forthright claim that
“It is clear that there is a continuing cover-up of the unsavoury activities that took place at the Kincora boys' home in East Belfast during the early seventies. After studying a Royal Ulster Constabulary file, the Director of Public Prosecutions recently decided that there are to be no further prosecutions in connection with allegations of homosexuality involving civil servants, military officers and Ulster politicians.”
Stephen Dorril (September 1983)  - [1]

Recent reports

A 2015 report by the Belfast Telegraph quoted Brian Gemmell, a spook that "One soldier who worked for me told me after I left that he drove a civilian, who he now thinks was MI5 but never identified himself, from HQNI to a meeting in Kincora. He did it a couple of times.".[2]

Investigation

The Northern Ireland Historical Institutional Abuse Inquiry began examining allegations relating to the Home on 31 May 2016, including claims that there was a paedophile ring at the home with links to the intelligence agencies. As of November 2016, it has not been admitted by MI5 or MI6 that they used this venue for purposes of Sexual blackmail.

 

Related Quotation

PageQuoteAuthorDate
Kincora Boys' Home“It is clear that there is a continuing cover-up of the unsavoury activities that took place at the Kincora boys' home in East Belfast during the early seventies. After studying a Royal Ulster Constabulary file, the Director of Public Prosecutions recently decided that there are to be no further prosecutions in connection with allegations of homosexuality involving civil servants, military officers and Ulster politicians.”Stephen DorrilSeptember 1983


References