Keith Officer

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Person.png Keith Officer   IMDBRdf-entity.pngRdf-icon.png
(diplomat)
Keith Officer.png
Born2 October 1889
Toorak, Melbourne
Died21 June 1969 (Age 79)
NationalityAustralian
Alma materMelbourne Grammar School, Melbourne University
One of the founders of the Australian Foreign Service. Single Bilderberg.

Employment.png Australian Ambassador to France

In office
18 April 1950 - March 1955
Attended the 1956 Bilderberg

Employment.png Australian Ambassador to China

In office
15 November 1948 - 17 October 1949

Employment.png Australian Counsellor at the British Embassy in the USA

In office
February 1937 - 1 March 1940
Australia's own Minister/Ambassador position to the US started on 1 March 1940.

Sir Frank Keith Officer was an Australian public servant and diplomat, best known for his postings in ambassadorial positions around the world.

Life and career

Keith Officer was born on 2 October 1889 in Toorak, Melbourne[1] He was educated at Melbourne Grammar School and Melbourne University.[2]

Between 1914 and 1918, Officer served with the First Australian Imperial Force in Egypt, Gallipoli, France and Belgium.[3]

From 1919 to 1923, Officer was a political officer of the British Colonial Service in Nigeria.[4]

He joined the Australian Department of External Affairs in 1927.[5]

During 1937, Joseph Lyons appointed Keith Officer as a liaison officer posted with the British Embassy in Washington, with the diplomatic rank of "Counsellor". Officer continued in the job until February 1940 when he became the charge d'Affaires, pending the arrival of Richard Casey as the first Minister.

Later inn 1940, Officer was appointed councilor to the Australian legation in Japan,[6] second in command to Sir John Latham.[7] He was Charge d'Affaires in Tokyo when the Pacific War broke out.[8]

Between 1946 and 1948, Officer was Australian Minister to the Netherlands.[9][10] Officer was offered the post of Australian Minister to Moscow in 1947.[11]

In 1948, Officer was appointed Australian Ambassador to the Republic of China.[12][13] He was recalled from Nanking in November 1949 to consult with the Department of External Affairs on the recognition of the Communist Government in China,[14] which did not happen.

Between 1950 and 1955 Officer was Australian Ambassador to France.[15] He retired from the Commonwealth Public Service at the end of March 1955.[15] His retirement prompted External Affairs Minister Richard Casey to write a letter touching on Officer's work, in which he said: "you can properly regard yourself not only as one of the founders of the Australian Foreign Service but as a model which men of succeeding generations can seek to emulate."[16]

He attended the 1956 Bilderberg conference.

References