Chief of the Communications Security Establishment Canada

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Employment.png Chief of the Communications Security Establishment Canada
(spook)

Start1941
Head of the Canadian cryptologic agency Communications Security Establishment

The Communications Security Establishment (CSE), formerly called the Communications Security Establishment Canada (CSEC), is the Government of Canada's national cryptologic agency.

ECHELON

Full article: ECHELON

Under the 1948 UKUSA agreement, CSE's intelligence is shared with the U.S. National Security Agency (NSA), the British Government Communications Headquarters (GCHQ), the Australian Signals Directorate (ASD), and New Zealand's Government Communications Security Bureau (GCSB).[1]

Along with these services from the United States, the UK, New Zealand, and Australia, CSE is part of the ECHELON system. Its capabilities are suspected to include the ability to monitor a very large proportion of the world's transmitted civilian telephone, fax and data traffic. The intercepted data, or "dictionaries" are "reported linked together through a high-powered array of computers known as 'Platform'."[2]


Heads of the CSE

Heads of the CSE[3]
Name Appointed Notes
Examination Unit
Herbert Yardley 1941 June 10
Oliver Strachey 1942 January
F.A. (Tony) Kendrick 1942 July
Gilbert de B. Robinson (acting) 1945 April until July 1945
Edward Drake 1945 August 1
Communications Branch of the National Research Council
Edward Drake 1946 September 1 died in office
Kevin O’Neill 1971 February
Communications Security Establishment
Peter Hunt 1980 July
Stewart Woolner 1989 July
Ian Glen 1999 July
Keith Coulter 2001 August
John Adams 2005 July
John Forster 2012 January 30
Greta Bossenmaier 2015 February 9
Shelly Bruce 2018 June 27


 

An Office Holder on Wikispooks

NameFromTo
John AdamsJuly 2005January 2012
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References

  1. https://www.cse-cst.gc.ca/en/culture-and-community/history
  2. Rudner, Martin. (2007). "Canada's Communications Security Establishment, Signals Intelligence and Counter-Terrorism". Intelligence and National Security: 22(4) pp. 473–490
  3. https://www.cse-cst.gc.ca/en/culture-and-community/history/timeline