Charles Jones

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Person.png Charles Jones Amazon PowerbaseRdf-icon.png
(academic, historian)
Alma materClare College (Cambridge)
InterestsCuba

Dr. Charles Jones was originally a historian of direct foreign investment and the political responses it provoked. In the late 1970s he concentrated on contemporary international economic relations.

More recently he has been working on civil-military relations in Latin America, the role of Christianity in the English School of International Relations, and representations of war and violence. He is a regular visitor to Argentina and Venezuela. Dr. Jones has worked extensively on the past and contemporary international economic relations of Latin America, especially the Southern Cone. His has also studied Romantic representations of organised violence in the Americas.

Background

Jones studied Moral Sciences and History at Clare College Cambridge, before turning to a doctorate on Anglo-Argentine relations.

Career

After many years teaching international political economy and developing postgraduate programmes at Warwick University, he moved to Cambridge in 1998, where he teaches international relations theory and Inter-American relations.

Jones was an Academic Advisor to the Cambridge Security Programme (CSP), Reader in the History of International Studies at the University of Cambridge and Director of the University of Cambridge Centre of Latin American Studies. As Director of the Centre of Latin American Studies he developed a research project on security in the Caribbean, centring on Cuba.

Publications

Recent publications include:

  • E H Carr and International Relations, (1998)
  • The Logic of Anarchy, an influential critique of neorealism, (Columbia UP 1993, with Barry Buzan and Richard Little)
  • El Reino Lunido Y America (Madrid 1992)
  • North-South Relations: a Brief History, (London 1983)

Charles Jones's next book explores the treatment of war in novels by Sir Walter Scott and his imitators in the Americas, including James Fennimore Cooper and Vicente Fidel Lopez. [1]



References

  1. 'Dr. Charles Jones', Cambridge Security Programme website, accessed 30 April, 2009.