Fabian Society

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Group.png Fabian Society   Powerbase Sourcewatch Spartacus Twitter WebsiteRdf-icon.png
Fabian.jpg
Abbreviation Fabians
Formation 1884
Headquarters London, United Kingdom
Subgroups • Young Fabians
• Fabian Women's Network
• Scottish Fabians
• around 60 local Fabian Societies

The Fabian Society is a British socialist organisation whose purpose is to advance the principles of Democratic Socialism via gradualist and reformist effort in democracies, rather than by revolutionary overthrow. Its aims are to promote greater equality of power, wealth and opportunity, the value of collective action and public service, an accountable, tolerant and active democracy, citizenship, liberty and human rights, sustainable development and multilateral international cooperation.[1]

Establishing Labour

As founders of the Labour Party in 1900, the Fabian Society has influenced British policy to the present day, from the postwar creation of the modern welfare state to the election of Tony Blair. Later members of the Fabian Society included Jawaharlal Nehru and other leaders of new nations created out of the former British Empire, who used Fabian principles to create socialist democracies in India, Pakistan, Nigeria and elsewhere as Britain decolonised after World War II.[2]

LSE

The Fabian Society founded the London School of Economics (LSE) in 1895 "for the betterment of society," now one of the leading educational institutions in the world. An incubator of influential politicians, economists, journalists, prime ministers and liberal billionaires, the LSE is said to have close links to MI6.[3]

Stuck

In January 2017, Andrew Harrop, General Secretary of the Fabian Society, published an analysis paper entitled "Stuck: How Labour is too weak to win, and too strong to die"[4] which suggested that Labour may get as little as 20% of the vote at the next General Election and win fewer than 150 seats.[5]



References

  1. Margaret Cole (1961). The Story of Fabian Socialism. Stanford University Press. ISBN 978-0804700917.<templatestyles src="Module:Citation/CS1/styles.css"></templatestyles>
  2. "Illustrated History"
  3. "Linking MI6, BP, LSE and Libya"
  4. "Stuck: How Labour is too weak to win, and too strong to die"
  5. "Labour could slump to below 150 MPs, Fabian Society warns"