Wirt Dexter Walker III

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Person.png Wirt Dexter Walker III History CommonsRdf-icon.png
(spook, deep state operative)
Spouse Sally Gregg White
A spook whose stock trades strongly suggest that he had foreknowledge of the 9/11 event.

Wirt Dexter Walker III is a business partner of Marvin Bush who engaged in damning insider trading in the run up to 9/11.[1][2] This was not investigated further by the 9/11 commission.[3]

Background

He graduated from Lafayette College in 1968 and landed a position in an “investment” firm called Glore Forgan.[4]

Career

Walker's career "ran parallel to those of two known CIA operatives — Ted Shackley and Robert Sensi"[citation needed], giving him "an extensive history of managing CIA front companies."[3] By 1982, Wirt Three was a director of the Kuwaiti-American Company, beocming director of the board Stratesec when Kuwam took it over in 1992.[4] He was also CEO of Commander Aircraft and Aviation General, both of which went bankrupt shortly after 9-11.

9/11 Insider Trading

Full article: 9-11/Insider Trading

On September 21, 2001, the SEC referred two specific transactions to the FBI for criminal investigation as potential informed trades. One of those trades was a September 6, 2001 purchase of 56,000 shares of Stratesec, security contractor for several of the facilities that were compromised on 9/11. These facilities included the WTC buildings, Dulles airport, where American Airlines Flight 77 took off, and also United Airlines, which owned two of the other three ill-fated planes.

As Stratesec director, Wirt Walker III, and his wife Sally Walker both bought the affected 56,000 shares of Stratesec stock. This is clear from a 2003 FBI memo (declassified in redacted form in 2009) generated to record the summary of the trades investigated. The Stratesec stock that the Walkers purchased doubled in value in the one trading day between September 11th and when the stock market reopened on September 17th. The Commission memorandum suggests that the trade generated a profit of $50,000 for the Walkers.

Non-investigation

After 9/11, the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) recommended that Stratesec be investigated for insider trading, but never followed through. The FBI declined to interview either of the Walkers, and instead made the claim that they were both cleared of any wrongdoing because they had "no ties to terrorism or other negative information." Outrageous enough as it stands, the claim is demonstrably false, considering Walker's ties to the Carlyle Group.[3]

 

Related Document

TitleTypePublication dateAuthor(s)Description
Wirt Walker, Russell and Co, CIA, and 911article3 September 2010Kevin Ryan


References