Civil unrest

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Concept.png Civil unrest 
(“Disaster”,  civil disobedience)Rdf-entity.pngRdf-icon.png
Subpage(s)Civil unrest/Preparation

Civil unrest is part of Disaster planing and preparation.

Preparations

Full article: Stub class article Civil unrest/Preparation

Extensive and often secret preparations are made to tackle civil unrest. Protests were often purposefully escalated to foster emergency legislation and to put an end to peace movements accusing them of threatening the social order, aka spreading civil unrest.

Further Examples

  • 1960 US-Japan Security Treaty Uprising[1]
  • 1968 peace protests (Vietnam War)
  • 1980 LA riots
  • 1989 Tiananmen Square protests in China
  • 2004 Paris riots

Examples include results from Social movement.

 

Examples

Page nameDescription
2011 England riots5 nights of unrest which followed the killing of Mark Duggan by the Metropolitan Police.
2022 Dutch farmer protestDuring summer of 2022, tens of thousands of farmers gathered from all across the Netherlands to protest government policies which will reduce the number of livestock -and farmers - by up to a third, as part of The Great Reset.
Canadian church attacksA coordinated string of vandalism and arson attacks on churches across Canada. The Canadian version of the George Floyd protests? (Ongoing)
George Floyd protestsProtests spread nationwide in the US after pictures of a sadistic murder by US police surfaced. (Ongoing)
Kenosha riots2020 saw a lot of violence across the USA, but the Kenosha riots were probably the most spooky.
Occupy movementA non-violent, decentralised movement which provoked a violent reaction from the authorities. A mass awakening for millions of youngsters.
Peace movement
The TroublesThe sectarian conflict in Northern Ireland which flared into serious sustained violence through the summer of 1969
Yellow vests movementA series of mass demonstrations in France which expressed the dissatisfaction with the political process. Subject to increasingly violent repression.

 

Related Document

TitleTypePublication dateAuthor(s)Description
Document:The Violent Vocabulary of Policingwebpage13 December 2010Dibyesh Anand


References