Bob Woodward

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Person.png Bob Woodward   History Commons IMDB Sourcewatch Spartacus
(journalist, spook?)
Bob Woodward.jpg
Born Robert Upshur Woodward
1943-03-26
Geneva, Illinois, U.S.
Alma mater Yale University
Children • Taliesin
• Diana
Spouse Elsa Walsh
Member of Book and Snake
Website http://bobwoodward.com/
Together with Carl Bernstein, Bob Woodward was an important player in the Watergate coup.

Journalist.png Journalist Wikipedia-icon.png

Dates unknown
Employer Washington Post
A player in the Watergate coup.

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Dates unknown
Employer Office of Naval Intelligence

Bob Woodward (Office of Naval Intelligence) together with fellow Washington Post journalist, Carl Bernstein was an important player in the Watergate coup. The official narrative celebrates him as a hero for exposing the "Watergate Scandal", but then the official history misses does not accept that that was a covert coup d'etat organised by the cabal.


Background

While at Yale, Woodward joined the Phi Gamma Delta fraternity and was a member of the secret society Book and Snake. [1][2] He received his B.A. degree in 1965, and began a five-year tour of duty in the United States Navy. In his navy career Woodward served in the Office of Naval Intelligence, where he was a part of a group which briefed top intelligence officials; at one time he was close to Admiral Robert O. Welander, being communications officer on the USS Fox under Welander's command.[3][4]

George W. Bush

Woodward was granted more time than any other journalist with George W. Bush, interviewing him six times for close to 11 hours total.[5] He gave credence to the lies about Iraq's weapons of mass destruction. During an appearance on Larry King Live, he was asked by a telephone caller, "Suppose we go to war and go into Iraq and there are no weapons of mass destruction," Woodward responded "I think the chance of that happening is about zero. There's just too much there."[6]

Criticism

A 2013 article in Salon.com which criticised his dishonesty was entitled "Woodward’s truthiness problem".[7]


References