Samantha Power

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Person.png Samantha Power   Powerbase SourcewatchRdf-entity.pngRdf-icon.png
(deep state operative)
Samantha Power.jpg
BornSamantha Jane Power
1970-09-21
Dublin, Ireland
Alma materYale University, Harvard University
ReligionRoman Catholicism
ChildrenDeclan Rían
SpouseCass Sunstein
Member ofBelfer Center for Science and International Affairs, Refugees International/Board, U.S. Committee for Human Rights in North Korea, WEF/Global Leaders for Tomorrow/2003, WEF/Young Global Leaders/2005
Interests“humanitarian intervention”
PartyDemocratic
Developed angle of "Responsibility to Protect" to create justification for wars

Employment.png USAID/Administrator Wikipedia-icon.png

In office
May 3, 2021 - Present
Appointed byJoe Biden

Employment.png United States Ambassador to the United Nations

In office
August 5, 2013 - January 20, 2017
Appointed byBarack Obama
Preceded byRosemary DiCarlo

Samantha Power is a US deep state operative. She was ambassador to the UN for President Obama from 2013 to 2017. Before that, she worked on Obama’s National Security Council, where she played an instrumental role in pushing for US open intervention in Libya in 2011, under the guise of protecting human rights and preventing genocide.[1]

She is married to Cass Sunstein, author of the infamous paper on "conspiracy theories". She is currently the Administrator of the United States Agency for International Development, a regime change outfit.

“Today, the Foundations are active on every continent, striving to promote vibrant and tolerant democracies with strong civic institutions and justice and health systems that work. It is rare that a week goes by, in my new incarnation [as United Nations Ambassador] — and I mean this — where I don’t meet an ambassador to the United Nations, a head of state or minister, a journalist or civil society advocate who didn’t either graduate from the Central European University, receive an Open Society grant, or once run an Open Society office. That’s how much George has populated the planet with his dedication to human rights and human dignity,””
Samantha Power (November 7, 2013)  [2]

Background

Power was born in London, the daughter of Irish parents. Raised in Ireland until she was nine, her mother emigrated to Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, in 1979.[3]

She attended school in Atlanta, Georgia. She subsequently received her B.A. degree from Yale University, where she was a member of Aurelian Honor Society, and her J.D. degree from Harvard Law School.[4] In 1993, at the age of 23, she became a U.S. citizen.

Career

After graduating from Yale, Power worked at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace as a researcher for Carnegie's then-President Morton Abramowitz. From 1993 to 1996, she worked as a war correspondent, covering the Yugoslav Wars for U.S. News & World Report, The Boston Globe, The Economist, and The New Republic. When she returned to the United States, she attended Harvard Law School, receiving her J.D. in 1999.

The following year, her first edited work, Realizing Human Rights: Moving from Inspiration to Impact (edited with Graham Allison) was published. Her first book, A Problem from Hell: America and the Age of Genocide, grew out of a paper she wrote while attending law school; it helped create the doctrine of "responsibility to protect."[5] in 2003. Her other books include Chasing the Flame: Sergio Vieira de Mello and the Fight to Save the World (2008), The Unquiet American: Richard Holbrook in the World (co-edited with Derek Chollet, 2011), and The Education of an Idealist: A Memoir (2019).

From 1998 to 2002, Power served as the Founding Executive Director of the Carr Center for Human Rights Policy at Harvard University's Kennedy School of Government, where she later served as the Anna Lindh Professor of Practice of Global Leadership and Public Policy.

In 2004, curiously early in her career, Power was named by Time magazine as one of the 100 most influential people in the world that year.[6] In fall 2007, she began writing a regular column for Time.

Power spent 2005–06 working in the office of U.S. Senator Barack Obama as a foreign policy fellow, where she was credited with sparking and directing Obama's interest in the Darfur conflict.[7] She was a senior foreign policy adviser to Obama's 2008 presidential campaign, but resigned during the primaries. In 2009 President Obama appointed her to a position on the National Security Council and in 2013 he appointed her as U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations, a cabinet-rank position.


 

A Quote by Samantha Power

PageQuote
Refugees International“If I’m reading in the newspaper about a crisis somewhere in the world, it is of great consolation to me to know that, if not at this moment, then very soon I will be hearing from Refugees International about how we should think about the crisis and more importantly what we should do about it.””

 

Related Document

TitleTypePublication dateAuthor(s)Description
Document:Hunger As A Weaponarticle17 February 2014Franklin LambOn the US's exploitation at the UN Security Council of humanitarian suffering in Syria to cynically further its policy aims.


References