Malaysia Airlines Flight 370/Blaine Alan Gibson's research

From Wikispooks
< Malaysia Airlines Flight 370
Revision as of 06:53, 3 March 2022 by Jun (talk | contribs) (For hcard)
(diff) ← Older revision | Latest revision (diff) | Newer revision → (diff)
Jump to navigation Jump to search

Event.png "“Conspiracy theory”"
Malaysia Airlines Flight 370/Blaine Alan Gibson's research(third rail topic) Rdf-entity.pngRdf-icon.png
Date2016
LocationMaldives,  Indian Ocean
Supposedly witnessed byMaldives, Indian Ocean
DescriptionUnexplained investigation in research for MH370

Blaine Gibson (born in San Francisco on April 21, 1957) is an American political scientist from San Francisco.

Background

"Gibson finished high school in Carmel and enrolled at the University of Oregon. While working toward a degree in political science he made his first visit to the Soviet Union in 1976, at the age of 19, “just to understand what it was like.” After graduating in 1979, he earned a master’s degree at The School of Advanced International Studies at Johns Hopkins University. He then worked briefly at a bank before spending three years on the staff of Washington State Senator Ray Moore, who like Gibson’s father was a staunch progressive.

Starting in September, 1986, Gibson took a job with the U.S. State Department. He was stationed in Rio de Janeiro and resigned after one year. He was in Red Square when the Soviet Union ended. According to a profile in Seattle Met magazine, “he could see that the Soviet Union was on the verge of collapse and decided to capitalize on it. For 10 years he lived off and on in the newly capitalist Russia, serving as a consultant to new business owners and fattening a bank account that would later fund his globe-trotting.”.

"In 1993 Gibson wrote a bill for the Washington State Senate that would establish a trade office in the Russian Far East. In 2002, he took part in a conference held in the western Russian city of Obninsk called “Successes and Difficulties of Small Innovative Firms in Russian Nuclear Cities: Proceedings of a Russian-American Workshop.” Gibson gave a talk about navigating the ambiguities between privately and publicly held companies in cities that are home to nuclear power plants, which at that time foreigners were still restricted from visiting. This suggests a deep level of knowledge on Gibson’s part about the workings of Russian business."[1]

Unexplained evidence

Blaine Gibson was reported in May 2018 as stating that he was subjected to stalking, death threats, and even assassination attempts being used to stop his work in finding MH370 debris: "In an interview with The West Australian, Gibson, who is said to have found more than half of the debris that has been discovered of the ill-fated jet, said his own search was subjected to intimidation, stalking, death threats, defamation, and assassination. "For whatever reasons, some people are very upset that I and other private citizens are finding pieces of the plane," he told the newspaper.[2] Gibson traveled to the Maldives and found the citizens that claimed and were willing to claim again that they saw a plane that has not been identified by the Maldives government, and that the government "denies" to the have even existed. One of Gibson's associates was even assassinated[3].

“This report makes no attempt or claim to prove that the large low flying jet plane seen over Kudahuvadhoo that fateful early morning was MH 370. It merely sets the record straight that the jet plane that overflew Kudahuvadhoo has not yet been identified. The Maldives government first claimed there was "no plane", then the plane was a "private jet", then fifteen months later a "domestic propeller plane flight", then back to "no plane", then finally to say it cannot be discussed due to "national security".”
Blaine Gibson (2016)  [4]


 

Related Quotation

PageQuoteAuthorDate
Malaysia Airlines Flight 370/Blaine Alan Gibson's research“This report makes no attempt or claim to prove that the large low flying jet plane seen over Kudahuvadhoo that fateful early morning was MH 370. It merely sets the record straight that the jet plane that overflew Kudahuvadhoo has not yet been identified. The Maldives government first claimed there was "no plane", then the plane was a "private jet", then fifteen months later a "domestic propeller plane flight", then back to "no plane", then finally to say it cannot be discussed due to "national security".”Blaine Gibson2016


References