David Malcolm Nott

From Wikispooks
Revision as of 11:02, 24 September 2019 by Robin (talk | contribs) (Mallcolm?)
(diff) ← Older revision | Latest revision (diff) | Newer revision → (diff)
Jump to navigation Jump to search

Person.png David Nott   Companies House Company Dircetor Check LinkedInRdf-icon.png
(Surgeon, pilot, businessman)
David Nott.jpg
BornDavid Malcolm Nott
1956
Carmarthen, Wales
Alma materHulme Grammar School, University of St Andrews, University of Manchester
Member ofWorld for Libya

David Malcolm (or Mallcolm)[1] Nott (born 1956) is a Welsh consultant surgeon who works mainly in London hospitals as a general and vascular surgeon but also volunteers to work in disaster and war zones, and also organises training for others in emergency work such as the charity World for Libya.[2]

Pilot Surgeon

The son of an orthopaedic surgeon, David Nott studied medicine at the Universities of St. Andrews and Manchester, graduating in 1981. He then learned to fly, gaining both a private pilot licence and a commercial pilot licence becoming an air transport pilot and flew for Hamlin Jet in Luton for about ten years, before returning to medicine and becoming a surgeon.

War zones

David Nott began working in disaster and war zones in 1993, when he saw footage of the war in Sarajevo. He has worked in disaster and war zones for several weeks each year since then, working as a volunteer surgeon for agencies such as Médecins Sans Frontières and the Red Cross. He has also served in a similar capacity for the Royal Auxiliary Air Force, where he holds the rank of Wing Commander. The locations have included Afghanistan, Bosnia, Chad, Darfur, Gaza, Haiti, Iraq, Libya, Sierra Leone and opposition-held areas of Syria. Between 2013 and 2014 Nott trained and assisted medical students and other doctors to conduct trauma surgeries in rebel-held East Aleppo.[3]

"David Nott met the Queen in 2014 just 10 days after flying back from Aleppo."[4]

"Doctors Under Fire" in Syria

David Nott advancing the "hospital bombing scam" in Syria

"Doctors Under Fire" has apparently just two members, Hamish de Bretton-Gordon and one David Nott, who cannot find a good word to say about the Syrian government. David Nott says "Doctors Under Fire" is a charity but the Charity Commission has no record of it, nor of "Medics Under Fire" which is what the "Doctors Under Fire" website is called. When you go to the website, you’re invited to a rally on 7th May. On further investigation, that is 7th May 2016. Their website is two years out of date. Of course hospitals should not be attacked in war zones, but the "Doctors Under Fire" platform gives Messrs De Bretton-Gordon and Nott credibility to advance another agenda: the "hospital bombing scam" in Syria.

This astonishing video collated all the times the "last hospital" in eastern Aleppo was put out of action by "Syrian regime airstrikes". Can you guess how many it was? And how do the mainstream media source their footage of sick children, hospitals, and dare we add, "Doctors Under Fire"? They are entirely dependent on the terrorists. No western journalist can venture into their areas. Why? For fear of being kidnapped and held for ransom by the very people they champion.

De Bretton Gordon also claimed on the BBC a hospital in eastern Ghouta had been hit. That was why they gave him a platform under his "Doctors Under Fire" persona. But again, it was second-hand terrorist propaganda. Here, the impressive Off-Guardian website exposes the Syrian totem head of the White Helmets, which is a British Foreign Office creation. This relentless tugging at western heart-strings is a scam and the msm know it.[5]

"Kind words for the dying children"

In December 2017, David Nott and fellow director Hamish de Bretton-Gordon of Doctors Under Fire highlighted the case of seven children with curable cancer who were said to be dying in Ghouta, Syria, for want of drugs and nourishment.[6] They claimed Union of Syrian Medical Care and Relief Organisations (UOSSM) hospitals in Ghouta were on their knees with very few medicines left, and that "kind words for the dying children" were the only palliative care available.[7]

External links

1956|


References