Canadian Broadcasting Corporation

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Group.png Canadian Broadcasting Corporation  
(Corporate mediaHistory Commons SourcewatchRdf-entity.pngRdf-icon.png
CBC Radio-Canada logo.svg
AbbreviationCBC
HeadquartersToronto Ontario, Canada (English); Montreal Quebec, Canada (French)
Type• Crown corporation
• Public broadcasting
• Broadcast
• Radio
• Television
A Canadian state-owned media outlet.

The Canadian Broadcasting Corporation (French: Société Radio-Canada) is a Canadian federal Crown corporation that serves as the national public broadcaster for both radio and television. The English- and French-language service units of the corporation are commonly known as CBC and Radio-Canada respectively, and both short-form names are also commonly used in the applicable language to refer to the corporation as a whole.[1]

After the Iraq war was over, the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation produced an Emmy award-winning TV documentary on the PR campaign titled "To Sell a War."

Coverage

As the Canadian state broadcaster, the CBC has upheld the Canadian government's Official Narrative.

Tara Henley

Tara Henley, at journalist a CBC since 2013, resigned in December 2021, stating her reasons as "in a short period of time, the CBC went from being a trusted source of news to churning out clickbait that reads like a parody of the student press...To work at the CBC now is to accept the idea that race is the most significant thing about a person, and that some races are more relevant to the public conversation than others. It is, in my newsroom, to fill out racial profile forms for every guest you book; to actively book more people of some races and less of others.

To work at the CBC is to submit to job interviews that are not about qualifications or experience — but instead demand the parroting of orthodoxies, the demonstration of fealty to dogma. It is to become less adversarial to government and corporations and more hostile to ordinary people with ideas that Twitter doesn’t like...It is to consent to the idea that a growing list of subjects are off the table, that dialogue itself can be harmful. That the big issues of our time are all already settled.

It used to be that I was the one furthest to the left in any newsroom, occasionally causing strain in story meetings with my views on issues like the housing crisis. I am now easily the most conservative, frequently sparking tension by questioning identity politics. This happened in the span of about 18 months. My own politics did not change."[2]


 

Related Document

TitleTypePublication dateAuthor(s)Description
Document:Why is the CBC Lying About VenezuelaArticle17 October 2018Alison BodineIt is our responsibility as people living in the United States and Canada to elevate the voices of poor, working and oppressed people in Venezuela who support the revolutionary government of President Nicolás Maduro.


References